Ribosome Rescue and Translation Termination at Non-Standard Stop Codons by ICT1 in Mammalian Mitochondria

Shiori Akabane, Takuya Ueda, Knud H. Nierhaus, Nono Takeuchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Release factors (RFs) govern the termination phase of protein synthesis. Human mitochondria harbor four different members of the class 1 RF family: RF1Lmt/mtRF1a, RF1mt, C12orf65 and ICT1. The homolog of the essential ICT1 factor is widely distributed in bacteria and organelles and has the peculiar feature in human mitochondria to be part of the ribosome as a ribosomal protein of the large subunit. The factor has been suggested to rescue stalled ribosomes in a codon-independent manner. The mechanism of action of this factor was obscure and is addressed here. Using a homologous mitochondria system of purified components, we demonstrate that the integrated ICT1 has no rescue activity. Rather, purified ICT1 binds stoichiometrically to mitochondrial ribosomes in addition to the integrated copy and functions as a general rescue factor, i.e. it releases the polypeptide from the peptidyl tRNA from ribosomes stalled at the end or in the middle of an mRNA or even from non-programmed ribosomes. The data suggest that the unusual termination at a sense codon (AGA/G) of the oxidative-phosphorylation enzymes CO1 and ND6 is also performed by ICT1 challenging a previous model, according to which RF1Lmt/mtRF1a is responsible for the translation termination at non-standard stop codons. We also demonstrate by mutational analyses that the unique insertion sequence present in the N-terminal domain of ICT1 is essential for peptide release rather than for ribosome binding. The function of RF1mt, another member of the class1 RFs in mammalian mitochondria, was also examined and is discussed.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPLoS Genetics
Volume10
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Sep 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Terminator Codon
stop codon
mitochondrion
ribosomes
Ribosomes
translation (genetics)
Mitochondria
mitochondria
Peptide Termination Factors
Codon
codons
protein
Peptides
peptide
Ribosomal Proteins
Insertional Mutagenesis
Oxidative Phosphorylation
Protein Subunits
harbor
oxidative phosphorylation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Ribosome Rescue and Translation Termination at Non-Standard Stop Codons by ICT1 in Mammalian Mitochondria. / Akabane, Shiori; Ueda, Takuya; Nierhaus, Knud H.; Takeuchi, Nono.

In: PLoS Genetics, Vol. 10, No. 9, 01.09.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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