Rock mechanics aspects of drilling and completing highly inclined wells in weak formations

Nobuo Morita, Lee Whitebay

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This paper reviews how rock mechanics concepts may be used to predict borehole stability during the drilling and production phases of field development. Cases are presented to illustrate the impact of in-situ stresses on drilling, completion, and production operations. The stability of highly inclined or horizontal wells is greatly influenced by rock strength and the effective vertical stress; which increases as the pore pressure in the reservoir drops. Factoring rock mechanics data into reservoir development plans can potentially save millions of dollars by reducing drilling and completion costs, and earn additional revenue through having more productive wells.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the University of Tulsa Centennial Petroleum Engineering Symposium
    Place of PublicationRichardson, TX, United States
    PublisherSociety of Petroleum Engineers (SPE)
    Pages265-276
    Number of pages12
    Publication statusPublished - 1994
    EventProceedings of the University of Tulsa Centennial Petroleum Engineering Symposium - Tulsa, OK, USA
    Duration: 1994 Aug 291994 Aug 31

    Other

    OtherProceedings of the University of Tulsa Centennial Petroleum Engineering Symposium
    CityTulsa, OK, USA
    Period94/8/2994/8/31

    Fingerprint

    Rock mechanics
    rock mechanics
    Drilling
    drilling
    well
    borehole stability
    Horizontal wells
    Pore pressure
    in situ stress
    Boreholes
    pore pressure
    Rocks
    cost
    rock
    Costs

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology
    • Fuel Technology

    Cite this

    Morita, N., & Whitebay, L. (1994). Rock mechanics aspects of drilling and completing highly inclined wells in weak formations. In Proceedings of the University of Tulsa Centennial Petroleum Engineering Symposium (pp. 265-276). Richardson, TX, United States: Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE).

    Rock mechanics aspects of drilling and completing highly inclined wells in weak formations. / Morita, Nobuo; Whitebay, Lee.

    Proceedings of the University of Tulsa Centennial Petroleum Engineering Symposium. Richardson, TX, United States : Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE), 1994. p. 265-276.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Morita, N & Whitebay, L 1994, Rock mechanics aspects of drilling and completing highly inclined wells in weak formations. in Proceedings of the University of Tulsa Centennial Petroleum Engineering Symposium. Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE), Richardson, TX, United States, pp. 265-276, Proceedings of the University of Tulsa Centennial Petroleum Engineering Symposium, Tulsa, OK, USA, 94/8/29.
    Morita N, Whitebay L. Rock mechanics aspects of drilling and completing highly inclined wells in weak formations. In Proceedings of the University of Tulsa Centennial Petroleum Engineering Symposium. Richardson, TX, United States: Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE). 1994. p. 265-276
    Morita, Nobuo ; Whitebay, Lee. / Rock mechanics aspects of drilling and completing highly inclined wells in weak formations. Proceedings of the University of Tulsa Centennial Petroleum Engineering Symposium. Richardson, TX, United States : Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE), 1994. pp. 265-276
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