RULES AND REGULATIONS IN LINGUISTIC LANDSCAPING: A Comparative Perspective

Peter Backhaus*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

According to Article 19 of the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948), everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression. This right includes the “freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.” While it is generally agreed that freedom of speech is one the most fundamental human rights, the degree to which this privilege may become subject to legal restrictions is a highly controversial issue that differs largely throughout different cultures and political systems. One linguistic domain where such restrictions are particularly prominent is language on signs. The nature of these restrictions and how they influence the shaping of the linguistic landscape (LL) in a given place is the subject matter of this chapter.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLinguistic Landscape
Subtitle of host publicationExpanding the Scenery
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages157-172
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)0203930967, 9781135859138
ISBN (Print)0415988721, 9780415988728
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Jan 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

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