‘Russian Spring’ or ‘Spring Betrayal’? The Media as a Mirror of Putin’s Evolving Strategy in Ukraine

Tomila Lankina, Kohei Watanabe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We analyse Russian state media’s framing of the Euromaidan protests using a novel Russian-language electronic content-analysis dictionary and method that we have developed ourselves. We find that around the time of Crimea’s annexation, the Kremlin-controlled media projected media narratives of protests as chaos and disorder, using legalistic jargon about the status of ethnic Russians and federalisation, only to abandon this strategy by the end of April 2014. The shift in media narratives corresponding to the outbreak of violence in the Donbas region gives credence to arguments about Putin’s strategic, interests-driven foreign policy, while adding nuance to those that highlight the role of norms and values.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1526-1556
Number of pages31
JournalEurope - Asia Studies
Volume69
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Nov 26
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • History
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Economics and Econometrics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of '‘Russian Spring’ or ‘Spring Betrayal’? The Media as a Mirror of Putin’s Evolving Strategy in Ukraine'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this