Sand-arch strength under fluid flow with and without capillary pressure

H. Arii, N. Morita, Y. Ito, E. Takano

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There are more than 15 sand control methods and one of the frequently used methods is the rate control method. There are mainly two cases where the rate control method can be applied: (1) permeability is significantly damaged around a well and the sand problem induced by erosion failure due to abnormally large drawdown can be controlled by the rate control method, and (2) the stability of a sand-arch built by disintegrated sand particles can be controlled by rate control. A series of laboratory tests were conducted in this work to measure the sand-arch strength using a polyaxial confining cell. The parameters changed in these experiments were the ratio of grain size to cavity diameter, grain distribution, oil-water ratio, and confining stresses. A similar experiment was previously conducted by the Colorado School of Mines ' and IKU2, however, the tests conducted by the Colorado School of Mines used 20-40 mesh loose sands which are too coarse compared with actual reservoir sands, and IKU used air instead of liquid flow. Both of them used a certain immobile water saturation while the saturation change from 0 to 30% significantly reveals the complex phenomena of water effects upon sand-arch strength. The present laboratory tests selected a large grain size to observe large mechanical arch strength without capillary pressure effects and an intermediate grain size to observe capillary pressure effects. An analytical solution of a spherical cavity growth due to erosion of the post-failure zone is also developed to verify the observed phenomena in the laboratory tests.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings - SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition
Pages1563-1577
Number of pages15
Publication statusPublished - 2005
EventSPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition, ATCE 2005 - Dallas, TX
Duration: 2005 Oct 92005 Oct 12

Other

OtherSPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition, ATCE 2005
CityDallas, TX
Period05/10/905/10/12

Fingerprint

Capillarity
capillary pressure
Arches
arch
fluid flow
Flow of fluids
Sand
sand
pressure effect
Pressure effects
grain size
Erosion
cavity
saturation
erosion
Water
drawdown
water
experiment
Experiments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology
  • Geology

Cite this

Arii, H., Morita, N., Ito, Y., & Takano, E. (2005). Sand-arch strength under fluid flow with and without capillary pressure. In Proceedings - SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition (pp. 1563-1577)

Sand-arch strength under fluid flow with and without capillary pressure. / Arii, H.; Morita, N.; Ito, Y.; Takano, E.

Proceedings - SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition. 2005. p. 1563-1577.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Arii, H, Morita, N, Ito, Y & Takano, E 2005, Sand-arch strength under fluid flow with and without capillary pressure. in Proceedings - SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition. pp. 1563-1577, SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition, ATCE 2005, Dallas, TX, 05/10/9.
Arii H, Morita N, Ito Y, Takano E. Sand-arch strength under fluid flow with and without capillary pressure. In Proceedings - SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition. 2005. p. 1563-1577
Arii, H. ; Morita, N. ; Ito, Y. ; Takano, E. / Sand-arch strength under fluid flow with and without capillary pressure. Proceedings - SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition. 2005. pp. 1563-1577
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