Sedentary behaviour and health: Mapping environmental and social contexts to underpin chronic disease prevention

Neville Owen, Jo Salmon, MohammadJavad Koohsari, Gavin Turrell, Billie Giles-Corti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

98 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The time that children and adults spend sedentary-put simply, doing too much sitting as distinct from doing too little physical activity-has recently been proposed as a population-wide, ubiquitous influence on health outcomes. It has been argued that sedentary time is likely to be additional to the risks associated with insufficient moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. New evidence identifies relationships of too much sitting with overweight and obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, some cancers and other adverse health outcomes. There is a need for a broader base of evidence on the likely health benefits of changing the relevant sedentary behaviours, particularly gathering evidence on underlying mechanisms and dose-response relationships. However, as remains the case for physical activity, there is a research agenda to be pursued in order to identify the potentially modifiable environmental and social determinants of sedentary behaviour. Such evidence is required so as to understand what might need to be changed in order to influence sedentary behaviours and to work towards population-wide impacts on prolonged sitting time. In this context, the research agenda needs to focus particularly on what can inform broad, evidence-based environmental and policy initiatives. We consider what has been learned from research on relationships of environmental and social attributes and physical activity; provide an overview of recent-emerging evidence on relationships of environmental attributes with sedentary behaviour; argue for the importance of conducting international comparative studies and addressing life-stage issues and socioeconomic inequalities and we propose a conceptual model within which this research agenda may be addressed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)174-177
Number of pages4
JournalBritish journal of sports medicine
Volume48
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Feb 1
Externally publishedYes

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Environmental Health
Chronic Disease
Exercise
Research
Environmental Policy
Health
Insurance Benefits
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Population
Cardiovascular Diseases
Obesity
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Sedentary behaviour and health : Mapping environmental and social contexts to underpin chronic disease prevention. / Owen, Neville; Salmon, Jo; Koohsari, MohammadJavad; Turrell, Gavin; Giles-Corti, Billie.

In: British journal of sports medicine, Vol. 48, No. 3, 01.02.2014, p. 174-177.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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