Seemingly Unrelated Interventions: Environmental Management Systems in the Workplace and Energy Saving Practices at Home

Toshi H. Arimura*, Kazuyuki Iwata, Hajime Katayama, Mari Sakudo

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To reduce their environmental impacts, a growing number of organizations worldwide have implemented environmental management systems (EMSs). In these organizations, energy conservation activities become usual behaviors for employees; thus, we hypothesize that employees continue such energy saving behaviors at home. This hypothesis is supported by data from surveys of individuals in Japan. Specifically, we find that the probability of engaging in energy saving practices at home is higher and that expenditures on electricity use are lower for individuals who work in organizations that implement EMSs than for individuals who do not work in organizations with EMSs. Our results suggest that beyond the original purpose of helping organizations reduce their environmental impacts, EMSs work as an intervention to promote household energy saving.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)761-794
Number of pages34
JournalEnvironmental and Resource Economics
Volume80
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Dec

Keywords

  • Electricity
  • Energy efficiency
  • Energy saving practices
  • Environmental management system
  • Household electricity expenditure
  • ISO14001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

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