Serum Concentrations of Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone, Triiodothyronine, and Thyroxine in Outpatients Infected with SARS-CoV2 in Khuzestan Province, Iran: A Disease Clinical Course Approach

Mahshid Naghashpour, Ali Darvishi, Maryam Adelipour, Reza Bagheri, Alexei Wong, Katsuhiko Suzuki, Sahar Golabi*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background and Objectives: The virus SARS-CoV2, which causes COVID-19, affects the endocrine system. This study investigated serum concentrations of the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroxine (T4) in 53 outpatients infected with SARS-CoV2 and 53 non-infected matched participants in Khuzestan Province, Iran. We also examined the possible association of clinical symptoms progression and disease severity with serum concentrations of TSH, T3, and T4. Materials and Methods: A checklist was applied to collect demographic and clinical data. Blood samples were taken for biochemical analysis of serum concentrations of TSH, T3, and T4. Clinical symptoms of the infected outpatients were monitored weekly for 28 days. Results: Our results indicated that, as the severity of the disease increased, the respiratory and pulse rates raised significantly. Additionally, disease severity was significantly different between genders. Specifically, 79.5% of the asymptomatic/mild, and 38.5% of moderate outpatients were men. We also found significantly lower serum T3 but higher T4 in infected outpatients, compared with controls. However, serum TSH did not significantly differ between the two groups. The generalized estimating equation (GEE) analysis revealed no relationship between clinical symptoms progression and disease severity with serum concentrations of TSH, T3, and T4 in our study population. Additionally, GEE analysis showed that the odds ratio of neurological symptoms among women was 2.5 times that of men, the odds ratio of neurological symptoms in illiterates was 10 times higher than that of those without a high-school diploma, and the chance of developing pulmonary symptoms in those without high-school diploma was about 21 times higher than illiterates. Conclusion: In conclusion, this study showed that infected outpatients had significantly lower serum T3 but higher T4 than non-infected participants. There was no relation between symptom progression and disease severity with serum concentrations of TSH, T3, and T4, but educational status and sex significantly affected the chance of neurological and pulmonary symptoms occurring over 28 days. Our results may be used to develop potential therapies to treat COVID-19 disease.

Original languageEnglish
Article number891
JournalMedicina (Lithuania)
Volume58
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022 Jul

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • SARS-CoV2
  • T3
  • T4
  • TSH
  • clinical symptoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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