Set point temperature and adaptive principle

Shin Ichi Tanabe, Mari Yamamoto

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Various countries have introduced a higher indoor set point temperature for offices to conserve energy. The typical set point temperature in Japanese offices is 26°C, but that of offices in the USA is much lower. This study aimed to reveal the historical transition in office thermal environments in Japan and other countries. According to a literature review, the design temperature of Japanese offices has been kept almost constant since the 1950s, when air conditioning systems and the design conditions were introduced to Japan from the USA. However, in the USA, the design temperature was later lowered for the summer. According to a database of field measurements in Japan, the indoor temperature was slightly higher in the 2000s than in the 1980s. The socioeconomic context has a significant influence.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011
Pages2907-2912
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Dec 1
Event12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011 - Austin, TX, United States
Duration: 2011 Jun 52011 Jun 10

Publication series

Name12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011
Volume4

Conference

Conference12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011
CountryUnited States
CityAustin, TX
Period11/6/511/6/10

Keywords

  • Adaptive model
  • Cool biz
  • HVAC
  • Sustainable building
  • Thermal comfort

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution

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  • Cite this

    Tanabe, S. I., & Yamamoto, M. (2011). Set point temperature and adaptive principle. In 12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011 (pp. 2907-2912). (12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011; Vol. 4).