Sex-specific associations of moderate and vigorous physical activity with physical fitness in adolescents

T. Kidokoro, H. Tanaka, K. Naoi, K. Ueno, T. Yanaoka, K. Kashiwabara, Masashi Miyashita

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study examined the sex-specific associations of moderate and vigorous physical activity (VPA) with physical fitness in 300 Japanese adolescents aged 12–14 years. Participants were asked to wear an accelerometer to evaluate physical activity (PA) levels of various intensities (i.e. moderate PA (MPA), 3–5.9 metabolic equivalents (METs); VPA, ≥6 METs; moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA), ≥3 METs). Eight fitness items were assessed (grip strength, bent-leg sit-up, sit-and-reach, side step, 50 m sprint, standing long jump, handball throw, and distance running) as part of the Japanese standardised fitness test. A fitness composite score was calculated using Japanese fitness norms, and participants were categorised according to their score from category A (most fit) to category E (least fit), with participants in categories D and E defined as having low fitness. It was found that for boys, accumulating more than 80.7 min/day of MVPA may reduce the probability of low fitness (odds ratio (ORs) [95% confidence interval (CI)] = 0.17 [0.06–0.47], p = .001). For girls, accumulating only 8.4 min of VPA could reduce the likelihood of exhibiting low fitness (ORs [95% CI] = 0.23 [0.05–0.89], p = .032). These results reveal that there are sex-specific differences in the relationship between PA and physical fitness in adolescents, suggesting that sex-specific PA recommendation may be needed to improve physical fitness in adolescents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Journal of Sport Science
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2016 May 26
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Physical Fitness
Exercise
Metabolic Equivalent
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Hand Strength
Sex Characteristics
Running
Leg

Keywords

  • adolescents
  • gender
  • intensity
  • Physical activity
  • physical fitness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Sex-specific associations of moderate and vigorous physical activity with physical fitness in adolescents. / Kidokoro, T.; Tanaka, H.; Naoi, K.; Ueno, K.; Yanaoka, T.; Kashiwabara, K.; Miyashita, Masashi.

In: European Journal of Sport Science, 26.05.2016, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kidokoro, T. ; Tanaka, H. ; Naoi, K. ; Ueno, K. ; Yanaoka, T. ; Kashiwabara, K. ; Miyashita, Masashi. / Sex-specific associations of moderate and vigorous physical activity with physical fitness in adolescents. In: European Journal of Sport Science. 2016 ; pp. 1-8.
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