Simple and engineered process yielding carbon nanotube arrays with 1.2 × 1013 cm-2 wall density on conductive underlayer at 400 °c

Nuri Na, Dong Young Kim, Yeong Gi So, Yuichi Ikuhara, Suguru Noda

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    16 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    A simple process is presented that realizes carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays that meet the process and structure requirements for use in large-scale integrated circuits. Ni particles are formed densely on a conductive TiN layer on SiO2/Si substrates through nucleation and growth by sputtering, which was stopped prior to percolation of the Ni particles. Ni particles as dense as 2.8 × 1012 cm-2 were formed after annealing at 400 °C and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was carried out at 400 °C by feeding C2H2 at partial pressures as low as 0.13-1.3 Pa so as not to kill the catalyst. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed the mass density of the arrays to be as high as 1.1 g cm-3. High resolution transmission electron microscopy showed the densely packed CNTs with an average wall number of eight. Atomic force microscopy of the root of the CNT arrays transferred to a SiO2/Si substrate enabled direct counting of individual CNTs, revealing areal densities of CNTs and CNT walls as high as 1.5 × 1012 and 1.2 × 1013 cm-2, respectively. The simple process, using conventional sputtering and CVD apparatus, with carefully engineered conditions offers a route for practical application of CNTs.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)773-781
    Number of pages9
    JournalCarbon
    Volume81
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

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    Carbon Nanotubes
    Carbon nanotubes
    Sputtering
    Chemical vapor deposition
    Substrates
    High resolution transmission electron microscopy
    Partial pressure
    Integrated circuits
    Atomic force microscopy
    Nucleation
    Annealing
    Scanning electron microscopy
    Catalysts

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Chemistry(all)

    Cite this

    Simple and engineered process yielding carbon nanotube arrays with 1.2 × 1013 cm-2 wall density on conductive underlayer at 400 °c. / Na, Nuri; Kim, Dong Young; So, Yeong Gi; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Noda, Suguru.

    In: Carbon, Vol. 81, No. 1, 2015, p. 773-781.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Na, Nuri ; Kim, Dong Young ; So, Yeong Gi ; Ikuhara, Yuichi ; Noda, Suguru. / Simple and engineered process yielding carbon nanotube arrays with 1.2 × 1013 cm-2 wall density on conductive underlayer at 400 °c. In: Carbon. 2015 ; Vol. 81, No. 1. pp. 773-781.
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    AU - Noda, Suguru

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