Skeletal muscle deoxygenation abnormalities in early post-myocardial infarction

Shun Takagi, Norio Murase, Ryotaro Kime, Masatsugu Niwayama, Takuya Osada, Toshihito Katsumura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Reduced peak aerobic capacity in chronic heart failure can be partly explained by impaired peripheral factors. However, skeletal muscle deoxygenation responses during exercise and their relation to peak aerobic capacity have not been fully established in early post-myocardial infarction (MI) patients.

Methods: Patients early post-MI (age, 61 ± 9 yr; n = 16; 21 ± 8 d after the first MI) and age-, height-, and weight-matched control participants (age, 61 ± 9 yr; n = 18) performed a ramp cycling exercise until exhaustion. Near-infrared spectroscopy at the belly of the vastus lateralis muscle in the left leg was recorded continuously for measurement of skeletal muscle deoxygenation responses during exercise.

Results: Peak oxygen uptake (18.4 ± 3.5 vs 28.2 ± 10.7 mL·kg-1Imin-1, P < 0.01) was significantly lower in MI. Change in muscle oxygen saturation from rest to peak exercise (ΔSmO2) was significantly greater in MI than that in controls (2.5% ± 5.6% vs -7.4% ± 3.4%, P < 0.01). Relative change in deoxygenated hemoglobin/myoglobin concentration from rest to peak exercise (Δdeoxy- Hb/Mb) was significantly lower in MI than that in controls (0.1 ± 3.6 vs 8.7 ± 6.4 KM, P < 0.01). In contrast, change in total hemoglobin/ myoglobin, which is an indicator of blood volume, was not significantly different between groups. Peak oxygen uptake was negatively correlated with ΔSmO2 (r = -0.53, P < 0.05) and positively associated with Δdeoxy-Hb/Mb at peak exercise (r = 0.65, P < 0.01) in MI.

Conclusions: Skeletal muscle deoxygenation abnormalities were observed during dynamic cycling exercise in early post-MI patients. These abnormalities were related to impaired peak aerobic capacity in early post-MI patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2062-2069
Number of pages8
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume46
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Nov 10
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Skeletal Muscle
Myocardial Infarction
Exercise
Myoglobin
Oxygen
Hemoglobins
Muscles
Architectural Accessibility
Near-Infrared Spectroscopy
Quadriceps Muscle
Blood Volume
Leg
Heart Failure
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Cycling exercise
  • Heart disease
  • Microcirculation
  • Near infrared spectroscopy
  • Oxygen transport

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Skeletal muscle deoxygenation abnormalities in early post-myocardial infarction. / Takagi, Shun; Murase, Norio; Kime, Ryotaro; Niwayama, Masatsugu; Osada, Takuya; Katsumura, Toshihito.

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 46, No. 11, 10.11.2014, p. 2062-2069.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Takagi, S, Murase, N, Kime, R, Niwayama, M, Osada, T & Katsumura, T 2014, 'Skeletal muscle deoxygenation abnormalities in early post-myocardial infarction', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 46, no. 11, pp. 2062-2069. https://doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0000000000000334
Takagi, Shun ; Murase, Norio ; Kime, Ryotaro ; Niwayama, Masatsugu ; Osada, Takuya ; Katsumura, Toshihito. / Skeletal muscle deoxygenation abnormalities in early post-myocardial infarction. In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2014 ; Vol. 46, No. 11. pp. 2062-2069.
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AU - Katsumura, Toshihito

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N2 - Purpose: Reduced peak aerobic capacity in chronic heart failure can be partly explained by impaired peripheral factors. However, skeletal muscle deoxygenation responses during exercise and their relation to peak aerobic capacity have not been fully established in early post-myocardial infarction (MI) patients.Methods: Patients early post-MI (age, 61 ± 9 yr; n = 16; 21 ± 8 d after the first MI) and age-, height-, and weight-matched control participants (age, 61 ± 9 yr; n = 18) performed a ramp cycling exercise until exhaustion. Near-infrared spectroscopy at the belly of the vastus lateralis muscle in the left leg was recorded continuously for measurement of skeletal muscle deoxygenation responses during exercise.Results: Peak oxygen uptake (18.4 ± 3.5 vs 28.2 ± 10.7 mL·kg-1Imin-1, P < 0.01) was significantly lower in MI. Change in muscle oxygen saturation from rest to peak exercise (ΔSmO2) was significantly greater in MI than that in controls (2.5% ± 5.6% vs -7.4% ± 3.4%, P < 0.01). Relative change in deoxygenated hemoglobin/myoglobin concentration from rest to peak exercise (Δdeoxy- Hb/Mb) was significantly lower in MI than that in controls (0.1 ± 3.6 vs 8.7 ± 6.4 KM, P < 0.01). In contrast, change in total hemoglobin/ myoglobin, which is an indicator of blood volume, was not significantly different between groups. Peak oxygen uptake was negatively correlated with ΔSmO2 (r = -0.53, P < 0.05) and positively associated with Δdeoxy-Hb/Mb at peak exercise (r = 0.65, P < 0.01) in MI.Conclusions: Skeletal muscle deoxygenation abnormalities were observed during dynamic cycling exercise in early post-MI patients. These abnormalities were related to impaired peak aerobic capacity in early post-MI patients.

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KW - Cycling exercise

KW - Heart disease

KW - Microcirculation

KW - Near infrared spectroscopy

KW - Oxygen transport

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