Sleep deprivation influences diurnal variation of human time perception with prefrontal activity change

A functional near-infrared spectroscopy study

Takahiro Soshi, Kenichi Kuriyama, Sayaka Aritake, Minori Enomoto, Akiko Hida, Miyuki Tamura, Yoshiharu Kim, Kazuo Mishima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human short-time perception shows diurnal variation. In general, short-time perception fluctuates in parallel with circadian clock parameters, while diurnal variation seems to be modulated by sleep deprivation per se. Functional imaging studies have reported that short-time perception recruits a neural network that includes subcortical structures, as well as cortical areas involving the prefrontal cortex (PFC). It has also been reported that the PFC is vulnerable to sleep deprivation, which has an influence on various cognitive functions. The present study is aimed at elucidating the influence of PFC vulnerability to sleep deprivation on short-time perception, using the optical imaging technique of functional near-infrared spectroscopy. Eighteen participants performed 10-s time production tasks before (at 21:00) and after (at 09:00) experimental nights both in sleep-controlled and sleep-deprived conditions in a 4-day laboratory-based crossover study. Compared to the sleep-controlled condition, one-night sleep deprivation induced a significant reduction in the produced time simultaneous with an increased hemodynamic response in the left PFC at 09:00. These results suggest that activation of the left PFC, which possibly reflects functional compensation under a sleep-deprived condition, is associated with alteration of short-time perception.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere8395
JournalPLoS One
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Time Perception
Sleep Deprivation
Near infrared spectroscopy
Near-Infrared Spectroscopy
near-infrared spectroscopy
Prefrontal Cortex
diurnal variation
sleep
Sleep
image analysis
Circadian Clocks
Optical Imaging
hemodynamics
cognition
circadian rhythm
Cross-Over Studies
neural networks
Cognition
Imaging techniques
Hemodynamics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Sleep deprivation influences diurnal variation of human time perception with prefrontal activity change : A functional near-infrared spectroscopy study. / Soshi, Takahiro; Kuriyama, Kenichi; Aritake, Sayaka; Enomoto, Minori; Hida, Akiko; Tamura, Miyuki; Kim, Yoshiharu; Mishima, Kazuo.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 5, No. 1, e8395, 01.01.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Soshi, Takahiro ; Kuriyama, Kenichi ; Aritake, Sayaka ; Enomoto, Minori ; Hida, Akiko ; Tamura, Miyuki ; Kim, Yoshiharu ; Mishima, Kazuo. / Sleep deprivation influences diurnal variation of human time perception with prefrontal activity change : A functional near-infrared spectroscopy study. In: PLoS One. 2010 ; Vol. 5, No. 1.
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