Slow sleep spindle and procedural memory consolidation in patients with major depressive disorder

Masaki Nishida, Yusaku Nakashima, Toru Nishikawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Evidence has accumulated, which indicates that, in healthy individuals, sleep enhances procedural memory consolidation, and that sleep spindle activity modulates this process. However, whether sleep-dependent procedural memory consolidation occurs in patients medicated for major depressive disorder remains unclear, as are the pharmacological and physiological mechanisms that underlie this process. Methods: Healthy control participants (n=17) and patients medicated for major depressive disorder (n=11) were recruited and subjected to a finger-tapping motor sequence test (MST; nondominant hand) paradigm to compare the averaged scores of different learning phases (presleep, postsleep, and overnight improvement). Participants' brain activity was recorded during sleep with 16 electroencephalography channels (between MSTs). Sleep scoring and frequency analyses were performed on the electroencephalography data. Additionally, we evaluated sleep spindle activity, which divided the spindles into fast-frequency spindle activity (12.5-16 Hz) and slow-frequency spindle activity (10.5-12.5 Hz). Result: Sleep-dependent motor memory consolidation in patients with depression was impaired in comparison with that in control participants. In patients with depression, age correlated negatively with overnight improvement. The duration of slow-wave sleep correlated with the magnitude of motor memory consolidation in patients with depression, but not in healthy controls. Slow-frequency spindle activity was associated with reduction in the magnitude of motor memory consolidation in both groups. Conclusion: Because the changes in slow-frequency spindle activity affected the thalamocortical network dysfunction in patients medicated for depression, dysregulated spindle generation may impair sleep-dependent memory consolidation. Our findings may help to elucidate the cognitive deficits that occur in patients with major depression both in the waking state and during sleep.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)63-72
Number of pages10
JournalNature and Science of Sleep
Volume8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Major Depressive Disorder
Sleep
Depression
Electroencephalography
Memory Consolidation
Fingers
Healthy Volunteers
Hand
Learning
Pharmacology

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Memory consolidation
  • Motor skill
  • Polysomnography
  • Sleep spindle
  • Thalamocortical network

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Slow sleep spindle and procedural memory consolidation in patients with major depressive disorder. / Nishida, Masaki; Nakashima, Yusaku; Nishikawa, Toru.

In: Nature and Science of Sleep, Vol. 8, 2016, p. 63-72.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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