Small-scale agroforestry in the uplands of Bangladesh

A case study

Tapan Kumar Nath, Makoto Inoue, Hla Myant

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Agroforestry, as a sustainable agricultural system, is being widely promoted all over the world, especially in developing countries. Besides traditional agroforestry practices practiced by the rural people, the Bangladesh government introduced several agroforestry systems for the prevention of land degradation and enhancement of rural livelihoods. In this chapter we explore the impact of small-scale agroforestry on upland community development in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, Bangladesh. More specifically, the study clarifies the merits and demerits of different agroforestry systems as perceived by planters, their impacts on the rural economy and the environment, planters' attitudes toward the adoption of agroforestry and impacts of various government policies. Field data was collected by administering questions to 90 randomly selected planters of the Upland Settlement Project (USP), as well as project staff. The results indicated that the agroforestry interventions have in fact increased planters' income through employment and the selling of farm products, as well as by improving the ecological conditions of these areas through reduction of soil erosion, increasing tree coverage and maintaining soil fertility. The adoption of different agroforestry systems was governed mainly by the planters' interest in following these techniques, their ability to cultivate the land in the prescribed manner, and the market demand for their products. The major obstacles that prevented increased agroforestry improvements included lack of confidence in new land use systems, inappropriate project design (e.g., top-down innovation approach) and policy issues regarding land tenure. Recommendations are being proposed to strengthen social capital in local organizations to enhance the livelihoods of the upland communities.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHandbook on Agroforestry
Subtitle of host publicationManagement Practices and Environmental Impact
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Pages251-274
Number of pages24
ISBN (Print)9781608763597
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

agroforestry
rural economy
project design
land tenure
land degradation
social capital
community development
farming system
soil fertility
soil erosion
innovation
developing world
income
farm
land use
market

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Nath, T. K., Inoue, M., & Myant, H. (2011). Small-scale agroforestry in the uplands of Bangladesh: A case study. In Handbook on Agroforestry: Management Practices and Environmental Impact (pp. 251-274). Nova Science Publishers, Inc..

Small-scale agroforestry in the uplands of Bangladesh : A case study. / Nath, Tapan Kumar; Inoue, Makoto; Myant, Hla.

Handbook on Agroforestry: Management Practices and Environmental Impact. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2011. p. 251-274.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Nath, TK, Inoue, M & Myant, H 2011, Small-scale agroforestry in the uplands of Bangladesh: A case study. in Handbook on Agroforestry: Management Practices and Environmental Impact. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., pp. 251-274.
Nath TK, Inoue M, Myant H. Small-scale agroforestry in the uplands of Bangladesh: A case study. In Handbook on Agroforestry: Management Practices and Environmental Impact. Nova Science Publishers, Inc. 2011. p. 251-274
Nath, Tapan Kumar ; Inoue, Makoto ; Myant, Hla. / Small-scale agroforestry in the uplands of Bangladesh : A case study. Handbook on Agroforestry: Management Practices and Environmental Impact. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2011. pp. 251-274
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