Sound-contingent visual motion aftereffect

Souta Hidaka, Wataru Teramoto, Maori Kobayashi, Yoichi Sugita

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: After a prolonged exposure to a paired presentation of different types of signals (e.g., color and motion), one of the signals (color) becomes a driver for the other signal (motion). This phenomenon, which is known as contingent motion aftereffect, indicates that the brain can establish new neural representations even in the adult's brain. However, contingent motion aftereffect has been reported only in visual or auditory domain. Here, we demonstrate that a visual motion aftereffect can be contingent on a specific sound.Results: Dynamic random dots moving in an alternating right or left direction were presented to the participants. Each direction of motion was accompanied by an auditory tone of a unique and specific frequency. After a 3-minutes exposure, the tones began to exert marked influence on the visual motion perception, and the percentage of dots required to trigger motion perception systematically changed depending on the tones. Furthermore, this effect lasted for at least 2 days.Conclusions: These results indicate that a new neural representation can be rapidly established between auditory and visual modalities.

Original languageEnglish
Article number44
JournalBMC Neuroscience
Volume12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 May 15
Externally publishedYes

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Motion Perception
Color
Visual Perception
Brain
Direction compound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Hidaka, S., Teramoto, W., Kobayashi, M., & Sugita, Y. (2011). Sound-contingent visual motion aftereffect. BMC Neuroscience, 12, [44]. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2202-12-44

Sound-contingent visual motion aftereffect. / Hidaka, Souta; Teramoto, Wataru; Kobayashi, Maori; Sugita, Yoichi.

In: BMC Neuroscience, Vol. 12, 44, 15.05.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hidaka, S, Teramoto, W, Kobayashi, M & Sugita, Y 2011, 'Sound-contingent visual motion aftereffect', BMC Neuroscience, vol. 12, 44. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2202-12-44
Hidaka S, Teramoto W, Kobayashi M, Sugita Y. Sound-contingent visual motion aftereffect. BMC Neuroscience. 2011 May 15;12. 44. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2202-12-44
Hidaka, Souta ; Teramoto, Wataru ; Kobayashi, Maori ; Sugita, Yoichi. / Sound-contingent visual motion aftereffect. In: BMC Neuroscience. 2011 ; Vol. 12.
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