Spino-pelvic-rhythm with forward trunk bending in normal subjects without low back pain

Kiyotaka Hasebe, Koichi Sairyo, Yasushi Hada, Akira Dezawa, Yu Okubo, Koji Kaneoka, Yoshio Nakamura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A strong correlation between low back pain and tight hamstrings has been reported. However, the effect of tight hamstrings on spinal biomechanics remains unclear. The purpose of the study was to investigate spino-pelvic-rhythm during forward bending of the trunk and to clarify the rhythm features with regard to hamstrings tightness. Eighteen healthy male adults with no history of low back pain volunteered to participate. First, we measured the finger-to-floor distance (FFD) in the upright position and set this parameter to 100 %. Using a spinal mouse, spinal alignment was measured in the following four positions: (1) upright posture - 100 % FFD; (2) forward bending - 50 % FFD; (3) forward bending - 25 % FFD; and (4) forward bending - 0 % FFD (fingers in contact with the floor). Changes of the angle of the thoracic and lumbar spine as well as the pelvis were calculated. As an indicator of tight hamstrings, we measured straight leg raising (SLR) angle. From positions 1-2 (phase I), the entire spino-pelvic angle moved in 104°. During this phase, the lumbar spine mainly moved. In the second phase (positions 2-3), it moved in 16°. Interestingly, all but 2 subjects showed a negative angle in the thoracic motion, meaning that the thoracic spine extended 4° during trunk flexion, thus exhibiting paradoxical motion. During this phase, lumbopelvic rhythm showed 2 patterns. In 7 subjects, pelvic motion was greater than lumbar motion, while the remaining subjects showed the opposite. In subjects without tight hamstrings, 83 % showed a pelvis-dominant pattern. Only 7 subjects were capable of position 4. During this phase, only slight motion was noted in the spine, and the majority of the motion occurred in the pelvis. Lumbar and pelvic motion correlated negatively in all phases. SLR angle and pelvic motion correlated strongly during phase III, indicating dominant pelvic movement in flexible subjects. The lumbo-pelvic-rhythm comprises 2 patterns - lumbar dominant and pelvis dominant. In flexible subjects, pelvis movement was dominant. In conclusion, improving tight hamstrings may reduce lumbar loading thereby reducing low back pain.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology
Volume24
Issue numberSUPPL.1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Low Back Pain
Fingers
Pelvis
Spine
Thorax
Leg
Posture
Biomechanical Phenomena

Keywords

  • Back pain
  • Hamstrings
  • Lumbo-pelvic-rhythm

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Spino-pelvic-rhythm with forward trunk bending in normal subjects without low back pain. / Hasebe, Kiyotaka; Sairyo, Koichi; Hada, Yasushi; Dezawa, Akira; Okubo, Yu; Kaneoka, Koji; Nakamura, Yoshio.

In: European Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Vol. 24, No. SUPPL.1, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Nakamura, Yoshio

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