SPontaneous Oscillatory Contraction (SPOC): Auto-oscillations observed in striated muscle at partial activation

James Erle Wolfe, Shin'ichi Ishiwata, Filip Braet, Renee Whan, Yingying Su, Sean Lal, Cristobal G. dos Remedios

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Striated muscle is well known to exist in either of two states-contraction or relaxation-under the regulation of Ca2+ concentration. Described here is a less well-known third, intermediate state induced under conditions of partial activation, known as SPOC (SPontaneous Oscillatory Contraction). This state is characterised by auto-oscillation between rapid-lengthening and slow-shortening phases. Notably, SPOC occurs in skinned muscle fibres and is therefore not the result of fluctuating Ca2+ levels, but is rather an intrinsic and fundamental phenomenon of the actomyosin motor. Summarised in this review are the experimental data on SPOC and its fundamental mechanism. SPOC presents a novel technique for studying independent communication and coordination between sarcomeres. In cardiac muscle, this auto-oscillatory property may work in concert with electro-chemical signalling to coordinate the heartbeat. Further, SPOC may represent a new way of demonstrating functional defects of sarcomeres in human heart failure.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)53-62
    Number of pages10
    JournalBiophysical Reviews
    Volume3
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2011

    Fingerprint

    Sarcomeres
    Striated Muscle
    Actomyosin
    Myocardium
    Heart Failure
    Communication
    Muscles

    Keywords

    • Auto-oscillation
    • Cardiac muscle
    • Sarcomere
    • Skeletal muscle
    • SPOC

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Biophysics
    • Molecular Biology
    • Structural Biology

    Cite this

    SPontaneous Oscillatory Contraction (SPOC) : Auto-oscillations observed in striated muscle at partial activation. / Wolfe, James Erle; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Braet, Filip; Whan, Renee; Su, Yingying; Lal, Sean; dos Remedios, Cristobal G.

    In: Biophysical Reviews, Vol. 3, No. 2, 2011, p. 53-62.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Wolfe, JE, Ishiwata, S, Braet, F, Whan, R, Su, Y, Lal, S & dos Remedios, CG 2011, 'SPontaneous Oscillatory Contraction (SPOC): Auto-oscillations observed in striated muscle at partial activation', Biophysical Reviews, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 53-62. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12551-011-0046-7
    Wolfe, James Erle ; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi ; Braet, Filip ; Whan, Renee ; Su, Yingying ; Lal, Sean ; dos Remedios, Cristobal G. / SPontaneous Oscillatory Contraction (SPOC) : Auto-oscillations observed in striated muscle at partial activation. In: Biophysical Reviews. 2011 ; Vol. 3, No. 2. pp. 53-62.
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