Sport and the mass media in Japan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The tendency in discussions of media consumption in the past decade has been to move away from political economy or the "production of consumption" perspective; it has been accompanied by a growing interest in the active audience, symbolic culture, and textual analysis. Though sport and the mass media are a popular research topic in English-language publications, the major focus has been on a narrow range of advanced capitalist economies. This article on the relationship between the mass media and sport in Japan takes issue with both these emphases and contributes to on-going debates about sport, the media, and the commodification of popular culture. First, it provides a sketch of episodes in the development of the mass media in Japan-especially the newspaper press, radio, and television-in conjunction with that of sport. The focal point is the involvement of business corporations in the development of relations between professional sport and the mass media and the underlying commercial logic that steers that development. Second, by focusing on Japanese examples, the article provides additional empirical data so that similarities and contrasts can be drawn among existing accounts of the development of mediasport in advanced capitalist countries. In particular, it is argued that much of the writing about sport and the mass media has been derived from examination of "Anglo-American" experiences. Attention to media and sport in Japan, both as an economic commodity and as a vehicle for the creation of meaningful discourse about national identity, raises questions about debates concerning sport, media, and globalization.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)415-432
Number of pages18
JournalSociology of Sport Journal
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mass Media
mass media
Sports
Japan
economic goods
Commodification
media consumption
professional sports
Newspapers
Internationality
popular culture
Television
national identity
English language
Radio
corporation
political economy
television
radio
newspaper

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Sport and the mass media in Japan. / Horne, John D.

In: Sociology of Sport Journal, Vol. 22, No. 4, 01.01.2005, p. 415-432.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{1f1bf676586549ca9778a14732f06aff,
title = "Sport and the mass media in Japan",
abstract = "The tendency in discussions of media consumption in the past decade has been to move away from political economy or the {"}production of consumption{"} perspective; it has been accompanied by a growing interest in the active audience, symbolic culture, and textual analysis. Though sport and the mass media are a popular research topic in English-language publications, the major focus has been on a narrow range of advanced capitalist economies. This article on the relationship between the mass media and sport in Japan takes issue with both these emphases and contributes to on-going debates about sport, the media, and the commodification of popular culture. First, it provides a sketch of episodes in the development of the mass media in Japan-especially the newspaper press, radio, and television-in conjunction with that of sport. The focal point is the involvement of business corporations in the development of relations between professional sport and the mass media and the underlying commercial logic that steers that development. Second, by focusing on Japanese examples, the article provides additional empirical data so that similarities and contrasts can be drawn among existing accounts of the development of mediasport in advanced capitalist countries. In particular, it is argued that much of the writing about sport and the mass media has been derived from examination of {"}Anglo-American{"} experiences. Attention to media and sport in Japan, both as an economic commodity and as a vehicle for the creation of meaningful discourse about national identity, raises questions about debates concerning sport, media, and globalization.",
author = "Horne, {John D.}",
year = "2005",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1123/ssj.22.4.415",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "415--432",
journal = "Sociology of Sport Journal",
issn = "0741-1235",
publisher = "Human Kinetics Publishers Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sport and the mass media in Japan

AU - Horne, John D.

PY - 2005/1/1

Y1 - 2005/1/1

N2 - The tendency in discussions of media consumption in the past decade has been to move away from political economy or the "production of consumption" perspective; it has been accompanied by a growing interest in the active audience, symbolic culture, and textual analysis. Though sport and the mass media are a popular research topic in English-language publications, the major focus has been on a narrow range of advanced capitalist economies. This article on the relationship between the mass media and sport in Japan takes issue with both these emphases and contributes to on-going debates about sport, the media, and the commodification of popular culture. First, it provides a sketch of episodes in the development of the mass media in Japan-especially the newspaper press, radio, and television-in conjunction with that of sport. The focal point is the involvement of business corporations in the development of relations between professional sport and the mass media and the underlying commercial logic that steers that development. Second, by focusing on Japanese examples, the article provides additional empirical data so that similarities and contrasts can be drawn among existing accounts of the development of mediasport in advanced capitalist countries. In particular, it is argued that much of the writing about sport and the mass media has been derived from examination of "Anglo-American" experiences. Attention to media and sport in Japan, both as an economic commodity and as a vehicle for the creation of meaningful discourse about national identity, raises questions about debates concerning sport, media, and globalization.

AB - The tendency in discussions of media consumption in the past decade has been to move away from political economy or the "production of consumption" perspective; it has been accompanied by a growing interest in the active audience, symbolic culture, and textual analysis. Though sport and the mass media are a popular research topic in English-language publications, the major focus has been on a narrow range of advanced capitalist economies. This article on the relationship between the mass media and sport in Japan takes issue with both these emphases and contributes to on-going debates about sport, the media, and the commodification of popular culture. First, it provides a sketch of episodes in the development of the mass media in Japan-especially the newspaper press, radio, and television-in conjunction with that of sport. The focal point is the involvement of business corporations in the development of relations between professional sport and the mass media and the underlying commercial logic that steers that development. Second, by focusing on Japanese examples, the article provides additional empirical data so that similarities and contrasts can be drawn among existing accounts of the development of mediasport in advanced capitalist countries. In particular, it is argued that much of the writing about sport and the mass media has been derived from examination of "Anglo-American" experiences. Attention to media and sport in Japan, both as an economic commodity and as a vehicle for the creation of meaningful discourse about national identity, raises questions about debates concerning sport, media, and globalization.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33748309924&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33748309924&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1123/ssj.22.4.415

DO - 10.1123/ssj.22.4.415

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 415

EP - 432

JO - Sociology of Sport Journal

JF - Sociology of Sport Journal

SN - 0741-1235

IS - 4

ER -