Stemflow hydrology and DOM flux in relation to tree size and rainfall event characteristics

Siyu Chen, Ruoming Cao, Shimpei Yoshitake, Toshiyuki Ohtsuka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Numerous studies have examined the variability of stemflow across different tree species under different meteorological conditions. However, studies have rarely considered stemflow associated with individual rainfall events and stemflow DOM flux. Therefore, we collected stemflow data from >100 individual rainfall events across four diameter size classes (20–30 cm, 30–40 cm, 40–50 cm, and DBH > 50 cm) of Castanopsis cuspidata in an evergreen forest (35° 26′ N, 136° 47E). The main objectives were to evaluate the stemflow hydrology and DOM flux characteristics in relation to tree size and different rainfall intensities based on a large dataset of individual rainfall events. In line with previous studies, the mean stemflow volumes and percentages of larger trees were higher than those of smaller trees; smaller trees have a higher funneling ratio than larger trees at both tree-scale (FRt) and stand-scale (FRs), which means that smaller trees are more effective in funneling water to their base. However, tree size significantly affects the stemflow volume and percentage only when the rainfall intensity is below 15 mm h−1. Tree size had a limited effect on the stemflow DOM concentration and stemflow DOM yield at a monthly scale. However, stemflow DOM flux and the flux-based DOM enrichment ratio were affected profoundly by tree size. Similar to the funneling ratio, small trees had a higher flux-based DOM enrichment ratio and supplied more DOM per unit trunk basal area. Thus, in addition to tree species, we suggest that tree size is also an important factor influencing the heterogeneity of the spatial patterns of the soil solution chemistry near the tree trunks.

Original languageEnglish
Article number107753
JournalAgricultural and Forest Meteorology
Volume279
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Dec 15

Fingerprint

stemflow
hydrology
rain
rainfall
rain intensity
precipitation intensity
tree trunk
Castanopsis cuspidata
evergreen forest
soil solution
basal area

Keywords

  • DOC
  • DON
  • Enrichment ratio
  • Rainfall intensity
  • Stemflow

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Forestry
  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

Stemflow hydrology and DOM flux in relation to tree size and rainfall event characteristics. / Chen, Siyu; Cao, Ruoming; Yoshitake, Shimpei; Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki.

In: Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, Vol. 279, 107753, 15.12.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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