Stereoscopy in Dental Education: An Investigation

Shumei Murakami, Rinus G. Verdonschot, Sven Kreiborg, Naoya Kakimoto, Asuka Kawaguchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate whether stereoscopy can play a meaningful role in dental education. The study used an anaglyph technique in which two images were presented separately to the left and right eyes (using red/cyan filters), which, combined in the brain, give enhanced depth perception. A positional judgment task was performed to assess whether the use of stereoscopy would enhance depth perception among dental students at Osaka University in Japan. Subsequently, the optimum angle was evaluated to obtain maximum ability to discriminate among complex anatomical structures. Finally, students completed a questionnaire on a range of matters concerning their experience with stereoscopic images including their views on using stereoscopy in their future careers. The results showed that the students who used stereoscopy were better able than students who did not to appreciate spatial relationships between structures when judging relative positions. The maximum ability to discriminate among complex anatomical structures was between 2 and 6 degrees. The students' overall experience with the technique was positive, and although most did not have a clear vision for stereoscopy in their own practice, they did recognize its merits for education. These results suggest that using stereoscopic images in dental education can be quite valuable as stereoscopy greatly helped these students' understanding of the spatial relationships in complex anatomical structures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)450-457
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Dental Education
Volume81
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Apr 1

Fingerprint

Dental Education
Students
Depth Perception
Aptitude
education
student
Dental Students
ability
Japan
brain
experience
Education
career
Brain
questionnaire

Keywords

  • anaglyph
  • dental education
  • oral and maxillofacial radiology
  • radiograph
  • stereoscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Murakami, S., Verdonschot, R. G., Kreiborg, S., Kakimoto, N., & Kawaguchi, A. (2017). Stereoscopy in Dental Education: An Investigation. Journal of Dental Education, 81(4), 450-457. https://doi.org/10.21815/JDE.016.002

Stereoscopy in Dental Education : An Investigation. / Murakami, Shumei; Verdonschot, Rinus G.; Kreiborg, Sven; Kakimoto, Naoya; Kawaguchi, Asuka.

In: Journal of Dental Education, Vol. 81, No. 4, 01.04.2017, p. 450-457.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Murakami, S, Verdonschot, RG, Kreiborg, S, Kakimoto, N & Kawaguchi, A 2017, 'Stereoscopy in Dental Education: An Investigation', Journal of Dental Education, vol. 81, no. 4, pp. 450-457. https://doi.org/10.21815/JDE.016.002
Murakami S, Verdonschot RG, Kreiborg S, Kakimoto N, Kawaguchi A. Stereoscopy in Dental Education: An Investigation. Journal of Dental Education. 2017 Apr 1;81(4):450-457. https://doi.org/10.21815/JDE.016.002
Murakami, Shumei ; Verdonschot, Rinus G. ; Kreiborg, Sven ; Kakimoto, Naoya ; Kawaguchi, Asuka. / Stereoscopy in Dental Education : An Investigation. In: Journal of Dental Education. 2017 ; Vol. 81, No. 4. pp. 450-457.
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