Street network measures and adults' walking for transport: Application of space syntax

MohammadJavad Koohsari, Takemi Sugiyama, Suzanne Mavoa, Karen Villanueva, Hannah Badland, Billie Giles-Corti, Neville Owen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The street network underpins the walkability of local neighborhoods. We examined whether two street network measures (intersection density and street integration from space syntax) were independently associated with walking for transport (WT); and, to what extent the relationship of street integration with WT may be explained by the presence of destinations. In 2003-2004, adults living in Adelaide, Australia (n=2544) reported their past-week WT frequency and perceived distances to 16 destination types. Marginal models via generalized estimating equations tested mediation effects. Both intersection density and street integration were significantly associated with WT, after adjusting for each other. Perceived destination availability explained 42% of the association of street integration with WT; this may be because of an association between street integration and local destination availability - an important element of neighborhood walkability. The use of space syntax concepts and methods has the potential to provide novel insights into built-environment influences on walking.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)89-95
Number of pages7
JournalHealth and Place
Volume38
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Mar 1
Externally publishedYes

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walking
syntax
Walking
mediation

Keywords

  • Active living
  • Built environment
  • Destination
  • Physical activity
  • Urban design
  • Walking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

Street network measures and adults' walking for transport : Application of space syntax. / Koohsari, MohammadJavad; Sugiyama, Takemi; Mavoa, Suzanne; Villanueva, Karen; Badland, Hannah; Giles-Corti, Billie; Owen, Neville.

In: Health and Place, Vol. 38, 01.03.2016, p. 89-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Koohsari, M, Sugiyama, T, Mavoa, S, Villanueva, K, Badland, H, Giles-Corti, B & Owen, N 2016, 'Street network measures and adults' walking for transport: Application of space syntax', Health and Place, vol. 38, pp. 89-95. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.healthplace.2015.12.009
Koohsari, MohammadJavad ; Sugiyama, Takemi ; Mavoa, Suzanne ; Villanueva, Karen ; Badland, Hannah ; Giles-Corti, Billie ; Owen, Neville. / Street network measures and adults' walking for transport : Application of space syntax. In: Health and Place. 2016 ; Vol. 38. pp. 89-95.
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