Symmetry Breaking: Scaffold Plays Matchmaker for Polarity Signaling Proteins

Benjamin D. Atkins, Satoshi Yoshida, David Pellman

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many cell types can spontaneously polarize even in the absence of specific positional cues. In budding yeast, this symmetry-breaking polarization depends on a scaffold protein called Bem1p. A recent study defines Bem1p's molecular function during symmetry breaking.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCurrent Biology
Volume18
Issue number24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Dec 23
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

scaffolding proteins
Saccharomycetales
Scaffolds
Yeast
Cues
Polarization
yeasts
Proteins
proteins
cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Symmetry Breaking : Scaffold Plays Matchmaker for Polarity Signaling Proteins. / Atkins, Benjamin D.; Yoshida, Satoshi; Pellman, David.

In: Current Biology, Vol. 18, No. 24, 23.12.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

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