Tactile-based curiosity maximizes tactile-rich object-oriented actions even without any extrinsic rewards

Hiroki Mori, Masayuki Masuda, Tetsuya Ogata

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This study proposed a hypothesis regarding the emergence of object-oriented action via tactile-based curiosity. The hypothesis is such that a curious exploration driven by tactile sensation leads tactile-rich object-oriented actions, while there are no explicit rewards or other designated intentional purposes. Experiments were with the curiosity model named the disagreement model from the reinforcement learning research field and with a simple physics robotic simulation with visual and tactile sensory information. The experimental results indicated that the tactile sensation induces object-oriented actions such as hitting and pecking by the body parts that have tactile sensors. We deduced that the hypothesis could be extended to discussions regarding the acquisition of dexterous skillful object manipulation in human development.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationICDL-EpiRob 2020 - 10th IEEE International Conference on Development and Learning and Epigenetic Robotics
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
ISBN (Electronic)9781728173061
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Oct 26
Event10th Joint IEEE International Conference on Development and Learning and Epigenetic Robotics, ICDL-EpiRob 2020 - Virtual, Valparaiso, Chile
Duration: 2020 Oct 262020 Oct 30

Publication series

NameICDL-EpiRob 2020 - 10th IEEE International Conference on Development and Learning and Epigenetic Robotics

Conference

Conference10th Joint IEEE International Conference on Development and Learning and Epigenetic Robotics, ICDL-EpiRob 2020
CountryChile
CityVirtual, Valparaiso
Period20/10/2620/10/30

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Decision Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Control and Optimization
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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