Task-dependent engagements of the primary visual cortex during kinesthetic and visual motor imagery

Nobuaki Mizuguchi, Maiko Nakamura, Kazuyuki Kanosue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Motor imagery can be divided into kinesthetic and visual aspects. In the present study, we investigated excitability in the corticospinal tract and primary visual cortex (V1) during kinesthetic and visual motor imagery. To accomplish this, we measured motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and probability of phosphene occurrence during the two types of motor imageries of finger tapping. The MEPs and phosphenes were induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation to the primary motor cortex and V1, respectively. The amplitudes of MEPs and probability of phosphene occurrence during motor imagery were normalized based on the values obtained at rest. Corticospinal excitability increased during both kinesthetic and visual motor imagery, while excitability in V1 was increased only during visual motor imagery. These results imply that modulation of cortical excitability during kinesthetic and visual motor imagery is task dependent. The present finding aids in the understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying motor imagery and provides useful information for the use of motor imagery in rehabilitation or motor imagery training.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)108-112
Number of pages5
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume636
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Imagery (Psychotherapy)
Visual Cortex
Phosphenes
Motor Evoked Potentials
Pyramidal Tracts
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Motor Cortex
Fingers
Rehabilitation

Keywords

  • Corticospinal excitability
  • Motor evoked potential
  • Phosphene

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Task-dependent engagements of the primary visual cortex during kinesthetic and visual motor imagery. / Mizuguchi, Nobuaki; Nakamura, Maiko; Kanosue, Kazuyuki.

In: Neuroscience Letters, Vol. 636, 01.01.2017, p. 108-112.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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