Teaching as a dynamic phenomenon with interpersonal interactions

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

People tend to assimilate toward each other. Importantly, assimilations occur both explicitly and implicitly at various levels, ranging from low-level sensory-motor coordination to high-level conceptual mimicry. Teaching is often confused with simply one means of enhancing learning. However, as we shall see in the other articles in this issue, teaching is a dynamic phenomenon where interpersonal interactions occur explicitly and implicitly at multiple levels. Bonding through coordinated interpersonal interactions occupies a substantial portion of teaching. In this article, I would like to introduce two interpersonal phenomena that exemplify implicit interactions and discuss their relations to the new realization of teaching.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)91-100
Number of pages10
JournalMind, Brain, and Education
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Jun
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Teaching
interaction
sensory motor
assimilation
Learning
learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Education

Cite this

Teaching as a dynamic phenomenon with interpersonal interactions. / Watanabe, Katsumi.

In: Mind, Brain, and Education, Vol. 7, No. 2, 06.2013, p. 91-100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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