Testing distributional hypothesis in patent translation

Hsin Hung Lin, Yves Lepage

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This paper presents a wordlist-based lexical richness approach to testing distributional hypothesis for genre analysis in translation studies. In recent years, there has been continuing interest in patent translation. However, there are only a few lay their interests on comparison between native and non-native writing. The proposed approach to terms distrubution of technical words contained in United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) and Japan Patent Office (JPO) in terms of lexical variation, lexical density and lexical sophistication, in brief, highlights distributional similarity of technical genre, and in particular, distibutional difference of academic and general genres.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 26th Conference on Computational Linguistics and Speech Processing, ROCLING 2014
EditorsChia-Hui Chang, Hsin-Min Wang, Jen-Tzung Chien, Hung-Yu Kao, Shih-Hung Wu
PublisherThe Association for Computational Linguistics and Chinese Language Processing (ACLCLP)
Pages185-192
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9789573079279
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Sep 1
Event26th Conference on Computational Linguistics and Speech Processing, ROCLING 2014 - Zhongli, Taiwan, Province of China
Duration: 2014 Sep 252014 Sep 26

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 26th Conference on Computational Linguistics and Speech Processing, ROCLING 2014

Conference

Conference26th Conference on Computational Linguistics and Speech Processing, ROCLING 2014
CountryTaiwan, Province of China
CityZhongli
Period14/9/2514/9/26

Keywords

  • Co-occurrence
  • Corpus
  • Native characterization
  • Patent translation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Speech and Hearing
  • Language and Linguistics

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  • Cite this

    Lin, H. H., & Lepage, Y. (2014). Testing distributional hypothesis in patent translation. In C-H. Chang, H-M. Wang, J-T. Chien, H-Y. Kao, & S-H. Wu (Eds.), Proceedings of the 26th Conference on Computational Linguistics and Speech Processing, ROCLING 2014 (pp. 185-192). (Proceedings of the 26th Conference on Computational Linguistics and Speech Processing, ROCLING 2014). The Association for Computational Linguistics and Chinese Language Processing (ACLCLP).