The critical role of the stem region as a functional domain responsible for the oligomerization and Golgi localization of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V. The involvement of a domain homophilic interaction

Ken Sasai, Yoshitaka Ikeda, Takeo Tsuda, Hideyuki Ihara, Hiroaki Korekane, Kunio Shiota, Naoyuki Taniguchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We demonstrated that a region in the stem of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V), a Golgi resident protein, is not required for enzyme activity but serves as functional domain, responsible for intracellular localization. Deletion of the domain led to complete retention of the kinetic properties but resulted in the cell surface localization of the enzyme as well as its efficient secretion into the medium. The lack of this domain concomitantly abolished the disulfide-mediated oligomerization of GnT-V, which appears to confer the Golgi retention. When the domain was inserted into the stem region of a cell surface-localized type II membrane protein, the resulting chimeric protein was substantially oligomerized and predominantly localized in the intracellular organelle. Furthermore, it was found that the presence of this domain is exclusively responsible for homo-oligomer formation. This homophilic interaction appears to involve a hydrophobic cluster of residues in the α-helix of the domain, as indicated by secondary structure predictions. These findings suggest that the domain specifically participates in the Golgi retention of GnT-V, probably via inducing homo-oligomer formation, and would also provide a possible mechanism for the oligomerization, which is critical for localization in the Golgi.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)759-765
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume276
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001 Jan 5
Externally publishedYes

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alpha-1,6-mannosylglycoprotein beta 1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase
Oligomerization
Oligomers
Enzyme activity
Enzymes
Disulfides
Organelles
Membrane Proteins
Proteins
Kinetics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

The critical role of the stem region as a functional domain responsible for the oligomerization and Golgi localization of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V. The involvement of a domain homophilic interaction. / Sasai, Ken; Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Tsuda, Takeo; Ihara, Hideyuki; Korekane, Hiroaki; Shiota, Kunio; Taniguchi, Naoyuki.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 276, No. 1, 05.01.2001, p. 759-765.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sasai, Ken ; Ikeda, Yoshitaka ; Tsuda, Takeo ; Ihara, Hideyuki ; Korekane, Hiroaki ; Shiota, Kunio ; Taniguchi, Naoyuki. / The critical role of the stem region as a functional domain responsible for the oligomerization and Golgi localization of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V. The involvement of a domain homophilic interaction. In: Journal of Biological Chemistry. 2001 ; Vol. 276, No. 1. pp. 759-765.
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