The dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus is not necessary for food-anticipatory circadian rhythms of behavior, temperature or clock gene expression in mice

Takahiro Moriya, Reiko Aida, Takashi Kudo, Masashi Akiyama, Masao Doi, Naomi Hayasaka, Norimichi Nakahata, Ralph Mistlberger, Hitoshi Okamura, Shigenobu Shibata

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    91 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Circadian rhythms in mammals are regulated by a light-entrainable circadian pacemaker in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus and food-entrainable oscillators located elsewhere in the brain and body. The dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH) has been proposed to be the site of oscillators driving food-anticipatory circadian rhythms, but this is controversial. To further evaluate this hypothesis, we measured clock gene, temperature and activity rhythms in intact and DMH-ablated mice. A single 4-h midday feeding after an overnight fast induced mPer1 and mPer2 mRNA expression in the DMH, arcuate nucleus, nucleus of the solitary tract and area postrema, and reset daily rhythms of mPer1, mPer2 and mBMAL1 in the DMH, arcuate and neocortex. These rhythms persisted during 2 days of food deprivation after 12 days of scheduled daytime feeding. Acute induction of DMH mPer1 and mPer2 was N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent, whereas rhythmic expression after 6 days of restricted feeding was not. Thermal DMH lesions did not affect acute induction or rhythmic expression of clock genes in other brain regions in response to scheduled daytime feeding. DMH lesions attenuated mean daily activity levels and nocturnality but did not affect food-anticipatory rhythms of activity and body temperature in either light-dark or constant darkness. These results confirm that the DMH and other brain regions express circadian clock gene rhythms sensitive to daytime feeding schedules, but do not support the hypothesis that DMH oscillations drive food-anticipatory behavioral or temperature rhythms.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1447-1460
    Number of pages14
    JournalEuropean Journal of Neuroscience
    Volume29
    Issue number7
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2009 Apr

    Fingerprint

    Dorsomedial Hypothalamic Nucleus
    Circadian Rhythm
    Gene Expression
    Food
    Temperature
    Brain
    Area Postrema
    Light
    Food Deprivation
    Arcuate Nucleus of Hypothalamus
    Circadian Clocks
    Suprachiasmatic Nucleus
    Solitary Nucleus
    Darkness
    Neocortex
    Body Temperature
    Genes
    Mammals
    Appointments and Schedules
    Hot Temperature

    Keywords

    • Arcuate nucleus
    • Food entrainment
    • MBMAL1
    • Period genes
    • Suprachiasmatic nucleus

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Neuroscience(all)

    Cite this

    The dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus is not necessary for food-anticipatory circadian rhythms of behavior, temperature or clock gene expression in mice. / Moriya, Takahiro; Aida, Reiko; Kudo, Takashi; Akiyama, Masashi; Doi, Masao; Hayasaka, Naomi; Nakahata, Norimichi; Mistlberger, Ralph; Okamura, Hitoshi; Shibata, Shigenobu.

    In: European Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 29, No. 7, 04.2009, p. 1447-1460.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Moriya, Takahiro ; Aida, Reiko ; Kudo, Takashi ; Akiyama, Masashi ; Doi, Masao ; Hayasaka, Naomi ; Nakahata, Norimichi ; Mistlberger, Ralph ; Okamura, Hitoshi ; Shibata, Shigenobu. / The dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus is not necessary for food-anticipatory circadian rhythms of behavior, temperature or clock gene expression in mice. In: European Journal of Neuroscience. 2009 ; Vol. 29, No. 7. pp. 1447-1460.
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    AU - Moriya, Takahiro

    AU - Aida, Reiko

    AU - Kudo, Takashi

    AU - Akiyama, Masashi

    AU - Doi, Masao

    AU - Hayasaka, Naomi

    AU - Nakahata, Norimichi

    AU - Mistlberger, Ralph

    AU - Okamura, Hitoshi

    AU - Shibata, Shigenobu

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    KW - Food entrainment

    KW - MBMAL1

    KW - Period genes

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