The effects of perception of efficacy and diagram construction skills on students' spontaneous use of diagrams when solving math word problems

Yuri Uesaka, Emmanuel Manalo, Shin'ichi Ichikawa

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although diagram use is considered to be one of the most effective strategies for solving problems, reports from applied educational research have noted that students lack spontaneity in using diagrams even when teachers extensively employ diagrams in instructions. To address this problem, the present study investigated the effectiveness of teacher-provided verbal encouragement (VE) and practice in drawing diagrams (PD), as additions to typical math classes, for promoting students' spontaneous use of diagrams when attempting to solve problems. The participants were 86 8th graders who were assigned to one of four instruction conditions: VE+PD, VE only, PD only, and with no addition to typical instruction (Control). The highest improvement in spontaneous diagram use was observed in the VE+PD condition. This finding suggests that, to promote spontaneity in students' diagram use, helping students appreciate the value of diagram use is important, as well as developing procedural knowledge in using diagrams.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Pages197-211
Number of pages15
Volume6170 LNAI
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Event6th International Conference on the Theory and Application of Diagrams, Diagrams 2010 - Portland, OR
Duration: 2010 Aug 92010 Aug 11

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume6170 LNAI
ISSN (Print)03029743
ISSN (Electronic)16113349

Other

Other6th International Conference on the Theory and Application of Diagrams, Diagrams 2010
CityPortland, OR
Period10/8/910/8/11

Fingerprint

Word problem
Efficacy
Diagram
Students
Perception
Skills

Keywords

  • construction skills in drawing diagrams
  • math word problem solving
  • perception of efficacy of diagrams use
  • spontaneous diagram use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Theoretical Computer Science

Cite this

Uesaka, Y., Manalo, E., & Ichikawa, S. (2010). The effects of perception of efficacy and diagram construction skills on students' spontaneous use of diagrams when solving math word problems. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) (Vol. 6170 LNAI, pp. 197-211). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 6170 LNAI). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-14600-8_19

The effects of perception of efficacy and diagram construction skills on students' spontaneous use of diagrams when solving math word problems. / Uesaka, Yuri; Manalo, Emmanuel; Ichikawa, Shin'ichi.

Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 6170 LNAI 2010. p. 197-211 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 6170 LNAI).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Uesaka, Y, Manalo, E & Ichikawa, S 2010, The effects of perception of efficacy and diagram construction skills on students' spontaneous use of diagrams when solving math word problems. in Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). vol. 6170 LNAI, Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 6170 LNAI, pp. 197-211, 6th International Conference on the Theory and Application of Diagrams, Diagrams 2010, Portland, OR, 10/8/9. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-14600-8_19
Uesaka Y, Manalo E, Ichikawa S. The effects of perception of efficacy and diagram construction skills on students' spontaneous use of diagrams when solving math word problems. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 6170 LNAI. 2010. p. 197-211. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-14600-8_19
Uesaka, Yuri ; Manalo, Emmanuel ; Ichikawa, Shin'ichi. / The effects of perception of efficacy and diagram construction skills on students' spontaneous use of diagrams when solving math word problems. Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 6170 LNAI 2010. pp. 197-211 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
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