The effects of sex differences on delayed-onset muscle soreness by cold-water immersion following resistance exercise

Risa Iwata*, Lili Chang, Hiroshi Akiyama, Takuji Kawamura, Katsuhiko Suzuki, Shizuo Sakamoto, Isao Muraoka

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to investigate whether sex differences affect delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) in response to cold-water immersion (CWI) following resistance exercise. Methods: Fourteen healthy young adults (8 males; height, 1.69±0.02 m; body mass, 60.6±8.1 kg and 6 females; height, 1.58±0.04 m; body mass, 52.6±1.9 kg [mean±SD]) performed high-intensity resistance exercise followed by CWI (15°C) for 15 minutes. Thermal sensation (TS) and thermal comfort (TC) were recorded every 5 minutes during CWI. Perceived muscle soreness assessed (VA S), mid-thigh circumference (CIR), range of motion (ROM), and countermovement jump (CMJ) were measured prior to, immediately, 2, 24, 48, and 72 hours after exercise. Blood samples were collected prior to and 2, 24, and 48 hours after the final set of exercise. Each blood sample was analyzed for creatine kinase (CK), myoglobin (Mb), white blood cells (WBC), and neutrophils (NEUT). Results: Significant time effects were seen for VAS, CMJ, CIR, WBC, and NEUT (P<0.05). CMJ, CIR, and CK were also significantly different between sexes (P<0.05). TS had a significant time effect and interaction (P<0.05). Conclusions: The present study demonstrated that the DOMS response to CWI did not differ by sex.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)80-89
Number of pages10
JournalGazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio per le Scienze Mediche
Volume181
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022 Jan
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Hydrotherapy
  • Individuality
  • Myalgia
  • Resistance training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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