The effects of thermal discomfort on task performance, fatigue and mental work load examined in a subjective experiment

Masaoki Haneda, Pawel Wargocki, Mariusz Dalewski, Shinichi Tanabe

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    A subjective experiment was conducted in a climate chamber to investigate the effects of thermal discomfort (feeling too warm) on the performance of office work. Twenty-seven Danish female subjects were exposed in a climate chamber to four conditions with different levels of thermal discomfort provided by a combination of operative temperature and amount of clothing. Thermal sensation votes towards the end of exposures were neutral, slightly warm, warm and very warm. More symptoms indicating mental fatigue were observed with increased thermal discomfort. The subjects reported that more effort was necessary when they felt thermally warm compared to conditions in which they felt thermally neutral and slightly warm. Performance of proof-reading, addition and text-typing tasks was not affected by thermal discomfort. This suggests that the subjects were able to maintain their performance but as a result they got more tired and the mental work load increased.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publication9th International Conference and Exhibition - Healthy Buildings 2009, HB 2009
    Publication statusPublished - 2009
    Event9th International Healthy Buildings Conference and Exhibition, HB 2009 - Syracuse, NY
    Duration: 2009 Sep 132009 Sep 17

    Other

    Other9th International Healthy Buildings Conference and Exhibition, HB 2009
    CitySyracuse, NY
    Period09/9/1309/9/17

    Fingerprint

    Fatigue of materials
    Experiments
    Hot Temperature
    Temperature

    Keywords

    • Fatigue
    • Mental workload
    • Performance
    • Productivity
    • Thermal environment

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Civil and Structural Engineering
    • Building and Construction

    Cite this

    Haneda, M., Wargocki, P., Dalewski, M., & Tanabe, S. (2009). The effects of thermal discomfort on task performance, fatigue and mental work load examined in a subjective experiment. In 9th International Conference and Exhibition - Healthy Buildings 2009, HB 2009

    The effects of thermal discomfort on task performance, fatigue and mental work load examined in a subjective experiment. / Haneda, Masaoki; Wargocki, Pawel; Dalewski, Mariusz; Tanabe, Shinichi.

    9th International Conference and Exhibition - Healthy Buildings 2009, HB 2009. 2009.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Haneda, M, Wargocki, P, Dalewski, M & Tanabe, S 2009, The effects of thermal discomfort on task performance, fatigue and mental work load examined in a subjective experiment. in 9th International Conference and Exhibition - Healthy Buildings 2009, HB 2009. 9th International Healthy Buildings Conference and Exhibition, HB 2009, Syracuse, NY, 09/9/13.
    Haneda M, Wargocki P, Dalewski M, Tanabe S. The effects of thermal discomfort on task performance, fatigue and mental work load examined in a subjective experiment. In 9th International Conference and Exhibition - Healthy Buildings 2009, HB 2009. 2009
    Haneda, Masaoki ; Wargocki, Pawel ; Dalewski, Mariusz ; Tanabe, Shinichi. / The effects of thermal discomfort on task performance, fatigue and mental work load examined in a subjective experiment. 9th International Conference and Exhibition - Healthy Buildings 2009, HB 2009. 2009.
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