The enhanced dissolution of some chlorinated hydrocarbons and monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in rainwater collected in Yokohama, Japan

Hiroshi Okochi, Daisuke Sugimoto, Manabu Igawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

By simultaneous sequential sampling of gas and rainwater from 1999 to 2000 in the campus of Kanagawa University in Yokohama, Japan, we investigated the wet-scavenging process of volatile organic compounds, some chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHs) and monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs), via rain droplets. Their volume-weighted mean concentrations in 125 rainwater were 4.98nM for dichloromethane, 3.71nM for toluene, 2.00nM for benzene, 0.93nM for 1,2-dichloroethane, 0.62nM for o-xylene, 0.57nM for m,p-xylene, 0.51nM for p-dichlorobenzene, and 0.35nM for trichloromethylene. Their rainwater concentrations did not depend on the rainfall intensity, and the temporal variation of their concentrations was similar to that of gas-phase concentrations. The dissolution of CHs and MAHs into rainwater, however, was larger than expected from their gas-phase concentrations at the ground and their temperature-corrected Henry's law constants. A simple below-cloud scavenging model, which was developed by Levine and Schwartz (Atmos. Environ. 16 (1982) 1725) could explain the independence of the rainfall intensity but not explain their enhanced dissolution in rainwater. The results of this study indicate the estimated concentrations, which were based on the Henry's law equilibrium, considerably underestimate the wet-deposition fluxes of CHs and MAHs onto the ground.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4403-4414
Number of pages12
JournalAtmospheric Environment
Volume38
Issue number26
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004 Aug
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

chlorinated hydrocarbon
Aromatic hydrocarbons
aromatic hydrocarbon
rainwater
Rain
Dissolution
Scavenging
dissolution
Xylene
Gases
xylene
precipitation intensity
Dichloromethane
Volatile organic compounds
Toluene
gas
Benzene
Fluxes
Sampling
wet deposition

Keywords

  • Chlorinated hydrocarbons
  • Henry's law
  • Monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons
  • Rainwater
  • The falling droplet approach

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Pollution

Cite this

The enhanced dissolution of some chlorinated hydrocarbons and monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in rainwater collected in Yokohama, Japan. / Okochi, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Daisuke; Igawa, Manabu.

In: Atmospheric Environment, Vol. 38, No. 26, 08.2004, p. 4403-4414.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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