The reciprocal relations between experiential avoidance, school stressor, and psychological stress response among Japanese adolescents

Kenichiro Ishizu, Yoshiyuki Shimoda, Tomu Otsuki

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The present study aimed to investigate the reciprocal relations between experiential avoidance, stressor, and psychological stress response (which consist of anger, depression, anxiety, helplessness, and physical complaints). In this study, 688 Japanese junior high school students (353 boys, 334 girls, 1 unidentified; mean age 13.28 years) completed three waves of questionnaires on experiential avoidance, stressor, and psychological stress response, with one-week intervals between measurement waves. Results from cross-lagged panel analyses showed that experiential avoidance predicted subsequent stressor and psychological stress response. Furthermore, the stressor and psychological stress response influenced by prior experiential avoidance affected subsequent occurrence of experiential avoidance. The findings suggest that reciprocal relations exist among the variables, and that the interaction between experiential avoidance and psychological stress was possible in adolescents.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article numbere0188368
    JournalPLoS One
    Volume12
    Issue number11
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2017 Nov 1

    Fingerprint

    Psychological Stress
    stress response
    Students
    middle school students
    Anger
    anxiety
    questionnaires
    Anxiety
    Depression

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
    • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

    Cite this

    The reciprocal relations between experiential avoidance, school stressor, and psychological stress response among Japanese adolescents. / Ishizu, Kenichiro; Shimoda, Yoshiyuki; Otsuki, Tomu.

    In: PLoS One, Vol. 12, No. 11, e0188368, 01.11.2017.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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