The relationship between muscle power and balance in postural control

Kotomi Shiota, Masataka Hosoda, Akira Takanashi, Tadamitsu Matusda, Shigeki Miyajima, Junya Aizawa, Makoto Ikeda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

[Purpose] In this study, we investigated the relationship between balance and muscle power in postural control. [Subjests] Subjects were 21 healthy individuals. [Methods] First, static balance was assessed using a Romberg balance test (standing with eyes opened and eyes closed) combined with a GRAVICORDER® (Anima, Japan). Then, we assessed active balance with the EQUITEST SYSTEM® (NEUROCOM, Clackamas, USA). Subjects' muscle strength was determined by knee extensor strength and knee extensor time to peak torque using a Biodex® (Biodex, USA), and by ankle plantar flexion and ankle dorsiflexion strength using a μ-Tas® (MT-1; Anima, Japan). Statistical analyses were performed Pearson's product moment correlation coefficient. [Results] A significant relationship between muscle strength and active balance were observed. Individuals who have high muscle strength and short times to peak torque possess a high capacity of balance and of learning improved postural control. [Conclusion] Static balance may not be a predictor of falls due to low levels of body sway secondary to generally poor ROM seen in elderly individuals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)817-821
Number of pages5
JournalRigakuryoho Kagaku
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Postural Balance
Muscle Strength
Torque
Ankle
Muscles
Knee
Japan
Learning
Power (Psychology)

Keywords

  • Balance
  • Muscle power
  • Postural control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Shiota, K., Hosoda, M., Takanashi, A., Matusda, T., Miyajima, S., Aizawa, J., & Ikeda, M. (2008). The relationship between muscle power and balance in postural control. Rigakuryoho Kagaku, 23(6), 817-821. https://doi.org/10.1589/rika.23.817

The relationship between muscle power and balance in postural control. / Shiota, Kotomi; Hosoda, Masataka; Takanashi, Akira; Matusda, Tadamitsu; Miyajima, Shigeki; Aizawa, Junya; Ikeda, Makoto.

In: Rigakuryoho Kagaku, Vol. 23, No. 6, 2008, p. 817-821.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shiota, K, Hosoda, M, Takanashi, A, Matusda, T, Miyajima, S, Aizawa, J & Ikeda, M 2008, 'The relationship between muscle power and balance in postural control', Rigakuryoho Kagaku, vol. 23, no. 6, pp. 817-821. https://doi.org/10.1589/rika.23.817
Shiota K, Hosoda M, Takanashi A, Matusda T, Miyajima S, Aizawa J et al. The relationship between muscle power and balance in postural control. Rigakuryoho Kagaku. 2008;23(6):817-821. https://doi.org/10.1589/rika.23.817
Shiota, Kotomi ; Hosoda, Masataka ; Takanashi, Akira ; Matusda, Tadamitsu ; Miyajima, Shigeki ; Aizawa, Junya ; Ikeda, Makoto. / The relationship between muscle power and balance in postural control. In: Rigakuryoho Kagaku. 2008 ; Vol. 23, No. 6. pp. 817-821.
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