The relationship between raising a child with a disability and the mental health of mothers compared to raising a child without disability in japan

Yui Yamaoka, Nanako Tamiya, Nobuyuki Izumida, Akira Kawamura, Hideto Takahashi, Haruko Noguchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective Previous studies conducted in Japan targeted only mothers who cared for children with disabilities, and lacked reference subjects, such as mothers of children without disabilities. The aim of this study was to examine the association between raising one or two children with a disability and maternal psychological distress compared to mothers of children without a disability, and to assess differences among partnered mothers living with grandparent(s), partnered mothers without grandparent(s), and single mothers. Methods This study utilized data from the Comprehensive Survey of Living Conditions (CSLC) in 2010. We merged the data of the children (aged six and over), mothers, and fathers. This study obtained 33,739 study subjects as a triad of a child (33,110 children without disabilities and 629 children with disabilities), mother, and father. The Japanese version of Kessler 6 (K6) was used to assess the psychological distress of mothers. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to assess the independent association of a child with a disability on maternal psychological distress after controlling for the basic characteristics of the children, mothers, and households. Results This study reported that raising one or two children with disabilities was significantly related to maternal psychological distress (odds ratio: 1.72 for one child, 2.85 for two children) compared to mothers of children without disability. After stratifying the analyses by family structure, significant associations remained among mothers in two-parent families but not for mothers in three-generation families and single mothers due to a small number of children with disabilities in these families. Conclusions This study reported the significant association between raising a child with a disability and maternal psychological distress in comparison to mothers of children without disabilities. Attention should be paid to not only single mothers, but also partnered mothers in two-parent families who have a child with a disability. It is important for health professionals to focus on the mental health of every mother of a child with a disability and to assess their needs for psychological support.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)542-548
Number of pages7
JournalSSM - Population Health
Volume2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Dec 1

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Disabled Children
Mental Health
Japan
disability
mental health
Mothers
Psychology
father
parents
Fathers
family structure
number of children
living conditions

Keywords

  • Children with disabilities
  • Family structure
  • Japan
  • Mothers
  • Psychological distress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

The relationship between raising a child with a disability and the mental health of mothers compared to raising a child without disability in japan. / Yamaoka, Yui; Tamiya, Nanako; Izumida, Nobuyuki; Kawamura, Akira; Takahashi, Hideto; Noguchi, Haruko.

In: SSM - Population Health, Vol. 2, 01.12.2016, p. 542-548.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yamaoka, Yui ; Tamiya, Nanako ; Izumida, Nobuyuki ; Kawamura, Akira ; Takahashi, Hideto ; Noguchi, Haruko. / The relationship between raising a child with a disability and the mental health of mothers compared to raising a child without disability in japan. In: SSM - Population Health. 2016 ; Vol. 2. pp. 542-548.
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AB - Objective Previous studies conducted in Japan targeted only mothers who cared for children with disabilities, and lacked reference subjects, such as mothers of children without disabilities. The aim of this study was to examine the association between raising one or two children with a disability and maternal psychological distress compared to mothers of children without a disability, and to assess differences among partnered mothers living with grandparent(s), partnered mothers without grandparent(s), and single mothers. Methods This study utilized data from the Comprehensive Survey of Living Conditions (CSLC) in 2010. We merged the data of the children (aged six and over), mothers, and fathers. This study obtained 33,739 study subjects as a triad of a child (33,110 children without disabilities and 629 children with disabilities), mother, and father. The Japanese version of Kessler 6 (K6) was used to assess the psychological distress of mothers. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to assess the independent association of a child with a disability on maternal psychological distress after controlling for the basic characteristics of the children, mothers, and households. Results This study reported that raising one or two children with disabilities was significantly related to maternal psychological distress (odds ratio: 1.72 for one child, 2.85 for two children) compared to mothers of children without disability. After stratifying the analyses by family structure, significant associations remained among mothers in two-parent families but not for mothers in three-generation families and single mothers due to a small number of children with disabilities in these families. Conclusions This study reported the significant association between raising a child with a disability and maternal psychological distress in comparison to mothers of children without disabilities. Attention should be paid to not only single mothers, but also partnered mothers in two-parent families who have a child with a disability. It is important for health professionals to focus on the mental health of every mother of a child with a disability and to assess their needs for psychological support.

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