The role of the hippocampus in passive and active spatial learning

Yutaka Kosaki, Tzu Ching Esther Lin, Murray R. Horne, John M. Pearce, Kerry E. Gilroy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rats with lesions of the hippocampus or sham lesions were required in four experiments to escape from a square swimming pool by finding a submerged platform. Experiments 1 and 2 commenced with passive training in which rats were repeatedly placed on the platform in one corner-the correct corner-of a pool with distinctive walls. A test trial then revealed a strong preference for the correct corner in the sham but not the hippocampal group. Subsequent active training of being required to swim to the platform resulted in both groups acquiring a preference for the correct corner in the two experiments. In Experiments 3 and 4, rats were required to solve a discrimination between different panels pasted to the walls of the pool, by swimming to the middle of a correct panel. Hippocampal lesions prevented a discrimination being formed between panels of different lengths (Experiment 3), but not between panels showing lines of different orientations (Experiment 4); rats with sham lesions mastered both problems. It is suggested that an intact hippocampus is necessary for the formation of stimulus-goal associations that permit successful passive spatial leaning. It is further suggested that an intact hippocampus is not necessary for the formation of stimulus-response associations, except when they involve information about length or distance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1633-1652
Number of pages20
JournalHippocampus
Volume24
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Dec 1
Externally publishedYes

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Problem-Based Learning
Hippocampus
Swimming Pools
Spatial Learning
Discrimination (Psychology)

Keywords

  • Hippocampus
  • Length discrimination
  • Passive learning
  • S-S versus S-R association
  • Spatial learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Kosaki, Y., Lin, T. C. E., Horne, M. R., Pearce, J. M., & Gilroy, K. E. (2014). The role of the hippocampus in passive and active spatial learning. Hippocampus, 24(12), 1633-1652. https://doi.org/10.1002/hipo.22343

The role of the hippocampus in passive and active spatial learning. / Kosaki, Yutaka; Lin, Tzu Ching Esther; Horne, Murray R.; Pearce, John M.; Gilroy, Kerry E.

In: Hippocampus, Vol. 24, No. 12, 01.12.2014, p. 1633-1652.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kosaki, Y, Lin, TCE, Horne, MR, Pearce, JM & Gilroy, KE 2014, 'The role of the hippocampus in passive and active spatial learning', Hippocampus, vol. 24, no. 12, pp. 1633-1652. https://doi.org/10.1002/hipo.22343
Kosaki, Yutaka ; Lin, Tzu Ching Esther ; Horne, Murray R. ; Pearce, John M. ; Gilroy, Kerry E. / The role of the hippocampus in passive and active spatial learning. In: Hippocampus. 2014 ; Vol. 24, No. 12. pp. 1633-1652.
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