The sidestep cutting manoeuvre requires exertion of lumbosacral lateral flexion torque to avoid excessive pelvic obliquity

Natsuki Sado, Shinsuke Yoshioka, Senshi Fukashiro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

During sidestep cutting, the pelvis is supported only on one side; this affects the athlete’s posture. This study investigated the mechanism to avoid excessive pelvic obliquity during sidestep cutting. Ten physically active men performed sidestep cutting with maximal effort, and we captured the kinematics and kinetics with force platforms and an eight-camera motion capture system. Our results indicated that the stance hip exerted little abduction torque; however, lumbosacral lateral flexion torque was exerted towards the free-leg side (peak value: 3.39 ± 0.91 N m/kg). Although bilateral hip joint forces acted to drop the free-leg side of the pelvis, the net torque around pelvic elevation/drop axis was nearly zero during the entire stance phase and the change in the angular momentum around the pelvic elevation/drop axis from touchdown to toe-off was negligible (−0.004 ± 0.003 N m s/kg). The integrated components of lateral flexor for elevating the free-leg side of the pelvis (0.220 ± 0.072 N m s/kg) were significantly larger than any other integrated components, which were all negligible (<0.010 N m s/kg). Thus, sidestep cutting requires the lumbosacral lateral flexion torque exertion to neutralise the passive action that drops the free-leg side of the pelvis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)135-145
Number of pages11
JournalSports Biomechanics
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Mar 4
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Change of direction
  • inverse dynamics
  • L5/S1
  • pelvic drop
  • turn

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The sidestep cutting manoeuvre requires exertion of lumbosacral lateral flexion torque to avoid excessive pelvic obliquity'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this