Thermal comfort and productivity in offices under mandatory electricity savings after the Great East Japan earthquake

Shinichi Tanabe, Yuko Iwahashi, Sayana Tsushima, Naoe Nishihara

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    36 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Little is known of workers comfort and productivity under special conditions, particularly after large disasters. The Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011 caused enormous damage, leading to a 15% peak-power reduction to address power shortages. We investigated occupants comfort and productivity in five office buildings in Tokyo during the summer season under mandatory electricity savings implemented after the earthquake. We changed the temperature, illumination and ventilation rate settings to investigate their effects on thermal comfort, productivity and energy levels. Occupants were more receptive towards decreased illumination than increased temperature. Awareness of power savings was increased, with more than 90% of people accepting the poor indoor environment in the light of recent events. Set-point temperature and clothing recommendations made by the Super Cool Biz campaign were followed in most offices. However, self-estimated productivity was 6.6% lower than the previous summer. Thus, electricity-saving strategies that do not affect productivity are required.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)4-13
    Number of pages10
    JournalArchitectural Science Review
    Volume56
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013 Feb 1

    Fingerprint

    Thermal comfort
    Earthquakes
    Electricity
    Productivity
    Lighting
    Office buildings
    Disasters
    Temperature
    Electron energy levels
    Ventilation

    Keywords

    • earthquake
    • electricity
    • energy saving
    • indoor environment
    • productivity

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Architecture

    Cite this

    Thermal comfort and productivity in offices under mandatory electricity savings after the Great East Japan earthquake. / Tanabe, Shinichi; Iwahashi, Yuko; Tsushima, Sayana; Nishihara, Naoe.

    In: Architectural Science Review, Vol. 56, No. 1, 01.02.2013, p. 4-13.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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