Thiol-Michael ‘click’ hydrogels as an imageable packing material for cancer therapy

Nicholas G. Moon, Allison M. Pekkanen, Timothy Edward Long, Timothy N. Showalter, Bruce Libby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Gynecological cancer treatment strategies commonly employ pelvic brachytherapy, a technique that temporarily locates radioactive materials in or near the source of the tumor. Despite numerous advances in brachytherapy treatment protocols, advances in the required vaginal packing materials lag significantly. This paper describes a packing material for vaginal brachytherapy based on a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogel. Commercially available oligomeric starting materials rapidly formed a hydrogel upon action of mild base (NaHCO3) through a thiol-Michael addition reaction. Tuning the base concentration enabled rapid formation of hydrogels with moduli sufficient for effective tissue displacement (>10 kPa). The poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate oligomer molecular weight exerted minimal influence on the hydrogel modulus. The hydrogels absorbed up to four times their weight in water from the dry state. CT imaging demonstrated distinguishability between hydrogel, water, and metal medical tools. The hydrogels did not induce significant IL-8 upregulation or cytotoxicity when cultured against vaginal macrophage cells, suggesting lack of immunogenicity. Our findings support these hydrogels as ideal candidates for a packing material in pelvic brachytherapy applications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)66-75
Number of pages10
JournalPolymer (United Kingdom)
Volume125
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Sep 8
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hydrogels
Hydrogel
Sulfhydryl Compounds
Polyethylene glycols
Radioactive materials
Addition reactions
Oncology
Water
Macrophages
Cytotoxicity
Interleukin-8
Oligomers
Tumors
Tuning
Metals
Molecular weight
Tissue
Imaging techniques

Keywords

  • Brachytherapy
  • Cancer
  • Hydrogel
  • Thiol-Michael

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Organic Chemistry
  • Polymers and Plastics

Cite this

Thiol-Michael ‘click’ hydrogels as an imageable packing material for cancer therapy. / Moon, Nicholas G.; Pekkanen, Allison M.; Long, Timothy Edward; Showalter, Timothy N.; Libby, Bruce.

In: Polymer (United Kingdom), Vol. 125, 08.09.2017, p. 66-75.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moon, Nicholas G. ; Pekkanen, Allison M. ; Long, Timothy Edward ; Showalter, Timothy N. ; Libby, Bruce. / Thiol-Michael ‘click’ hydrogels as an imageable packing material for cancer therapy. In: Polymer (United Kingdom). 2017 ; Vol. 125. pp. 66-75.
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