Three-dimensional blood flow analysis in a wide-necked internal carotid artery-ophthalmic artery aneurysm

Satoshi Tateshima, Fernando Viñuela, J. Pablo Villablanca, Yuichi Murayama, Taku Morino, Kiyoe Nomura, Kazuo Tanishita

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Object. The aim of this study was to evaluate axial and secondary flow structures in a wide-necked internal carotid artery-ophthalmic artery aneurysm, one of the most common locations for endovascular coil placement. Methods. A clear acrylic aneurysm model was manufactured from a three-dimensional computerized tomography angiogram. Intraaneurysm blood flow analysis was conducted using an acrylic aneurysm model together with laser Doppler velocimetry and particle imaging velocimetry. The maximal axial blood flow velocities in the inflow and outflow zones at the aneurysm orifice were noted at the peak systolic phase, measuring 46.8 and 24.9% of that in the parent artery, respectively. The mean size of the inflow zone during one cardiac cycle was 44.3 ± 9.8% (range 35.6-58.7%) the size of the axial section at the aneurysm orifice. In the lower and upper planes of the aneurysm dome, the mean size of inward and outward flow areas were 43.3 ± 6.7% and 43.8 ± 6.8% the size of the axial cross-sectional plane, respectively. The axial flow velocity structures were dynamically altered throughout the cardiac cycle, particularly at the aneurysm orifice. The fastest secondary flow at the opening was also noted at the peak systolic and early diastolic phases. Axial blood flow velocity was slower in the upper axial plane of the aneurysm dome than in the lower one. Conversely, the secondary flow component was faster in the upper plane. Conclusions. The side-wall aneurysm in this study did not demonstrate a simple flow pattern as was previously seen in ideally shaped experimental aneurysms in vitro and in vivo. The flow patterns of inflow and outflow zones were very difficult to predict based on the limited flow information provided on standard digital subtraction angiography, even in an aneurysm with a relatively simple dome shape.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)526-533
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume99
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Sep 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ophthalmic Artery
Internal Carotid Artery
Aneurysm
Blood Flow Velocity
Laser-Doppler Flowmetry
Digital Subtraction Angiography
Rheology
Angiography
Arteries

Keywords

  • Blood flow velocity
  • Cerebral aneurysm
  • Hemodynamics
  • Internal carotid artery-ophthalmic artery aneurysm

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Tateshima, S., Viñuela, F., Villablanca, J. P., Murayama, Y., Morino, T., Nomura, K., & Tanishita, K. (2003). Three-dimensional blood flow analysis in a wide-necked internal carotid artery-ophthalmic artery aneurysm. Journal of Neurosurgery, 99(3), 526-533.

Three-dimensional blood flow analysis in a wide-necked internal carotid artery-ophthalmic artery aneurysm. / Tateshima, Satoshi; Viñuela, Fernando; Villablanca, J. Pablo; Murayama, Yuichi; Morino, Taku; Nomura, Kiyoe; Tanishita, Kazuo.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery, Vol. 99, No. 3, 01.09.2003, p. 526-533.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tateshima, S, Viñuela, F, Villablanca, JP, Murayama, Y, Morino, T, Nomura, K & Tanishita, K 2003, 'Three-dimensional blood flow analysis in a wide-necked internal carotid artery-ophthalmic artery aneurysm', Journal of Neurosurgery, vol. 99, no. 3, pp. 526-533.
Tateshima S, Viñuela F, Villablanca JP, Murayama Y, Morino T, Nomura K et al. Three-dimensional blood flow analysis in a wide-necked internal carotid artery-ophthalmic artery aneurysm. Journal of Neurosurgery. 2003 Sep 1;99(3):526-533.
Tateshima, Satoshi ; Viñuela, Fernando ; Villablanca, J. Pablo ; Murayama, Yuichi ; Morino, Taku ; Nomura, Kiyoe ; Tanishita, Kazuo. / Three-dimensional blood flow analysis in a wide-necked internal carotid artery-ophthalmic artery aneurysm. In: Journal of Neurosurgery. 2003 ; Vol. 99, No. 3. pp. 526-533.
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abstract = "Object. The aim of this study was to evaluate axial and secondary flow structures in a wide-necked internal carotid artery-ophthalmic artery aneurysm, one of the most common locations for endovascular coil placement. Methods. A clear acrylic aneurysm model was manufactured from a three-dimensional computerized tomography angiogram. Intraaneurysm blood flow analysis was conducted using an acrylic aneurysm model together with laser Doppler velocimetry and particle imaging velocimetry. The maximal axial blood flow velocities in the inflow and outflow zones at the aneurysm orifice were noted at the peak systolic phase, measuring 46.8 and 24.9{\%} of that in the parent artery, respectively. The mean size of the inflow zone during one cardiac cycle was 44.3 ± 9.8{\%} (range 35.6-58.7{\%}) the size of the axial section at the aneurysm orifice. In the lower and upper planes of the aneurysm dome, the mean size of inward and outward flow areas were 43.3 ± 6.7{\%} and 43.8 ± 6.8{\%} the size of the axial cross-sectional plane, respectively. The axial flow velocity structures were dynamically altered throughout the cardiac cycle, particularly at the aneurysm orifice. The fastest secondary flow at the opening was also noted at the peak systolic and early diastolic phases. Axial blood flow velocity was slower in the upper axial plane of the aneurysm dome than in the lower one. Conversely, the secondary flow component was faster in the upper plane. Conclusions. The side-wall aneurysm in this study did not demonstrate a simple flow pattern as was previously seen in ideally shaped experimental aneurysms in vitro and in vivo. The flow patterns of inflow and outflow zones were very difficult to predict based on the limited flow information provided on standard digital subtraction angiography, even in an aneurysm with a relatively simple dome shape.",
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AU - Villablanca, J. Pablo

AU - Murayama, Yuichi

AU - Morino, Taku

AU - Nomura, Kiyoe

AU - Tanishita, Kazuo

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N2 - Object. The aim of this study was to evaluate axial and secondary flow structures in a wide-necked internal carotid artery-ophthalmic artery aneurysm, one of the most common locations for endovascular coil placement. Methods. A clear acrylic aneurysm model was manufactured from a three-dimensional computerized tomography angiogram. Intraaneurysm blood flow analysis was conducted using an acrylic aneurysm model together with laser Doppler velocimetry and particle imaging velocimetry. The maximal axial blood flow velocities in the inflow and outflow zones at the aneurysm orifice were noted at the peak systolic phase, measuring 46.8 and 24.9% of that in the parent artery, respectively. The mean size of the inflow zone during one cardiac cycle was 44.3 ± 9.8% (range 35.6-58.7%) the size of the axial section at the aneurysm orifice. In the lower and upper planes of the aneurysm dome, the mean size of inward and outward flow areas were 43.3 ± 6.7% and 43.8 ± 6.8% the size of the axial cross-sectional plane, respectively. The axial flow velocity structures were dynamically altered throughout the cardiac cycle, particularly at the aneurysm orifice. The fastest secondary flow at the opening was also noted at the peak systolic and early diastolic phases. Axial blood flow velocity was slower in the upper axial plane of the aneurysm dome than in the lower one. Conversely, the secondary flow component was faster in the upper plane. Conclusions. The side-wall aneurysm in this study did not demonstrate a simple flow pattern as was previously seen in ideally shaped experimental aneurysms in vitro and in vivo. The flow patterns of inflow and outflow zones were very difficult to predict based on the limited flow information provided on standard digital subtraction angiography, even in an aneurysm with a relatively simple dome shape.

AB - Object. The aim of this study was to evaluate axial and secondary flow structures in a wide-necked internal carotid artery-ophthalmic artery aneurysm, one of the most common locations for endovascular coil placement. Methods. A clear acrylic aneurysm model was manufactured from a three-dimensional computerized tomography angiogram. Intraaneurysm blood flow analysis was conducted using an acrylic aneurysm model together with laser Doppler velocimetry and particle imaging velocimetry. The maximal axial blood flow velocities in the inflow and outflow zones at the aneurysm orifice were noted at the peak systolic phase, measuring 46.8 and 24.9% of that in the parent artery, respectively. The mean size of the inflow zone during one cardiac cycle was 44.3 ± 9.8% (range 35.6-58.7%) the size of the axial section at the aneurysm orifice. In the lower and upper planes of the aneurysm dome, the mean size of inward and outward flow areas were 43.3 ± 6.7% and 43.8 ± 6.8% the size of the axial cross-sectional plane, respectively. The axial flow velocity structures were dynamically altered throughout the cardiac cycle, particularly at the aneurysm orifice. The fastest secondary flow at the opening was also noted at the peak systolic and early diastolic phases. Axial blood flow velocity was slower in the upper axial plane of the aneurysm dome than in the lower one. Conversely, the secondary flow component was faster in the upper plane. Conclusions. The side-wall aneurysm in this study did not demonstrate a simple flow pattern as was previously seen in ideally shaped experimental aneurysms in vitro and in vivo. The flow patterns of inflow and outflow zones were very difficult to predict based on the limited flow information provided on standard digital subtraction angiography, even in an aneurysm with a relatively simple dome shape.

KW - Blood flow velocity

KW - Cerebral aneurysm

KW - Hemodynamics

KW - Internal carotid artery-ophthalmic artery aneurysm

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