Toward understanding the nature of musical performance and interaction with wind instrument-playing humanoids

Jorge Solis, Atsuo Takanishi

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    The research on Music Playing-Instrument Humanoid Robots (MP-HRs) has a long tradition in the research field of robotics since the development of the humanoid pianist robot WABOT-2 developed at Waseda University (1984). Since then, several researchers have been aiming for the better understanding of the human musical performance. For this purpose, different mechanical designs and cognitive functions have been implemented on them. A particular interest was given to wind instruments as a research approach for understanding human breathing mechanism. Nowadays, different kinds of automated machines and humanoid robots have been developed for playing wind instruments to understand the human motor control from an engineering point of view. Moreover, the importance of studying the ways of enabling the interaction between musicians-humanoid is being attracting several researchers from different research fields. As a long-term research goal, we are aiming to enable wind playing-instrument humanoid robots to display motor dexterities and high-level perceptual capabilities to interact with other musician partners. In this paper, we present our current research achievements on the development of an anthropomorphic saxophonist robot and the implementation of a musical-based interaction system tested on an anthropomorphic flutist robot.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings - IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication
    Pages725-730
    Number of pages6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010
    Event19th IEEE International Conference on Robot and Human Interactive Communication, RO-MAN 2010 - Viareggio
    Duration: 2010 Sep 122010 Sep 15

    Other

    Other19th IEEE International Conference on Robot and Human Interactive Communication, RO-MAN 2010
    CityViareggio
    Period10/9/1210/9/15

    Fingerprint

    Anthropomorphic robots
    Robots
    Robotics

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Software
    • Artificial Intelligence
    • Human-Computer Interaction

    Cite this

    Solis, J., & Takanishi, A. (2010). Toward understanding the nature of musical performance and interaction with wind instrument-playing humanoids. In Proceedings - IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (pp. 725-730). [5598648] https://doi.org/10.1109/ROMAN.2010.5598648

    Toward understanding the nature of musical performance and interaction with wind instrument-playing humanoids. / Solis, Jorge; Takanishi, Atsuo.

    Proceedings - IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication. 2010. p. 725-730 5598648.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Solis, J & Takanishi, A 2010, Toward understanding the nature of musical performance and interaction with wind instrument-playing humanoids. in Proceedings - IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication., 5598648, pp. 725-730, 19th IEEE International Conference on Robot and Human Interactive Communication, RO-MAN 2010, Viareggio, 10/9/12. https://doi.org/10.1109/ROMAN.2010.5598648
    Solis J, Takanishi A. Toward understanding the nature of musical performance and interaction with wind instrument-playing humanoids. In Proceedings - IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication. 2010. p. 725-730. 5598648 https://doi.org/10.1109/ROMAN.2010.5598648
    Solis, Jorge ; Takanishi, Atsuo. / Toward understanding the nature of musical performance and interaction with wind instrument-playing humanoids. Proceedings - IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication. 2010. pp. 725-730
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