Unwanted sounds generated with test tone presentation can spoil extended high-frequency audiometry.

Kenji Kurakata, Tazu Mizunami, Kazuma Matsushita, Kimio Shiraishi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Unwanted sounds from a commercially available audiometer were evaluated in terms of their effects on extended high-frequency (EHF) audiometry. Although the manufacturer reported that the audiometer conformed to relevant International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standards, the audiograms obtained using the audiometer were erroneous because the subjects had responded falsely to noise generated with the test tone presentation before detecting the test tone. Analyses of acoustic and electric output signals revealed that the audiometer generated most of the unwanted sounds, not the earphones that were used. Based on the measurement results, clinical implications of the measurement results are discussed for conducting more reliable EHF audiometry.

Original languageEnglish
JournalThe Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume128
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Oct
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

audiometry
Audiometry
acoustics
Acoustics
earphones
Noise
conduction
output
Sound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Unwanted sounds generated with test tone presentation can spoil extended high-frequency audiometry. / Kurakata, Kenji; Mizunami, Tazu; Matsushita, Kazuma; Shiraishi, Kimio.

In: The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 128, No. 4, 10.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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