Vegetation and endemic tree response to orbital-scale climate changes in the Japanese archipelago during the last glacial–interglacial cycle based on pollen records from Lake Biwa, western Japan

Ryoma Hayashi, Hikaru Takahara, Yoshio Inouchi, Keiji Takemura, Yaeko Igarashi

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This study examined the orbital-scale vegetation response to seasonal climate changes related to the East Asian monsoon and ocean currents during the last glacial–interglacial cycle based on a new continuous pollen record from Lake Biwa, western Japan. During MIS 6, 4, and 2, pinaceous conifer forests were present in both inland and Japan Sea coastal areas around Lake Biwa, influenced by cold and dry conditions in both summer and winter. In contrast, deciduous broadleaved forests and evergreen forests grew during interglacial periods in MIS 5e and 1 under relatively warm and humid conditions in summer, as well as in winter. Fagus crenata, a tree endemic to the Japanese archipelago, was especially widely distributed during MIS 5e due in part to winter snowfall caused by warm current inflows in the Sea of Japan. During MIS 5 and 3, temperate conifer trees were dominant. During periods of low summer insolation in MIS 5, the endemic tree Cryptomeria japonica became dominant in both inland and coastal areas of the region, likely as a result of high precipitation in early summer related to southward shifts of the summer monsoon front and moderate winter climate conditions. In contrast, Sciadopitys verticillata, which is also an endemic tree, had own habitat around inland areas of western Japan during the periods of high summer insolation in MIS 5. Climate fluctuations during the glacial–interglacial cycles created several ecological niches in time and space for each endemic tree in the Japanese archipelago.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)85-97
    Number of pages13
    JournalReview of Palaeobotany and Palynology
    Volume241
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jun 1

    Fingerprint

    archipelago
    pollen
    climate change
    Japan
    lakes
    vegetation
    summer
    lake
    winter
    insolation
    coniferous tree
    Sciadopitys verticillata
    solar radiation
    monsoon
    Fagus crenata
    climate
    Cryptomeria japonica
    water currents
    Sea of Japan
    evergreen forest

    Keywords

    • Endemic tree species
    • Japanese archipelago
    • Lake Biwa
    • Orbital-scale climate changes
    • Pollen analysis
    • Vegetation fluctuations

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
    • Palaeontology

    Cite this

    @article{3b6c03066cc34f468cee9693207c8ee6,
    title = "Vegetation and endemic tree response to orbital-scale climate changes in the Japanese archipelago during the last glacial–interglacial cycle based on pollen records from Lake Biwa, western Japan",
    abstract = "This study examined the orbital-scale vegetation response to seasonal climate changes related to the East Asian monsoon and ocean currents during the last glacial–interglacial cycle based on a new continuous pollen record from Lake Biwa, western Japan. During MIS 6, 4, and 2, pinaceous conifer forests were present in both inland and Japan Sea coastal areas around Lake Biwa, influenced by cold and dry conditions in both summer and winter. In contrast, deciduous broadleaved forests and evergreen forests grew during interglacial periods in MIS 5e and 1 under relatively warm and humid conditions in summer, as well as in winter. Fagus crenata, a tree endemic to the Japanese archipelago, was especially widely distributed during MIS 5e due in part to winter snowfall caused by warm current inflows in the Sea of Japan. During MIS 5 and 3, temperate conifer trees were dominant. During periods of low summer insolation in MIS 5, the endemic tree Cryptomeria japonica became dominant in both inland and coastal areas of the region, likely as a result of high precipitation in early summer related to southward shifts of the summer monsoon front and moderate winter climate conditions. In contrast, Sciadopitys verticillata, which is also an endemic tree, had own habitat around inland areas of western Japan during the periods of high summer insolation in MIS 5. Climate fluctuations during the glacial–interglacial cycles created several ecological niches in time and space for each endemic tree in the Japanese archipelago.",
    keywords = "Endemic tree species, Japanese archipelago, Lake Biwa, Orbital-scale climate changes, Pollen analysis, Vegetation fluctuations",
    author = "Ryoma Hayashi and Hikaru Takahara and Yoshio Inouchi and Keiji Takemura and Yaeko Igarashi",
    year = "2017",
    month = "6",
    day = "1",
    doi = "10.1016/j.revpalbo.2017.02.008",
    language = "English",
    volume = "241",
    pages = "85--97",
    journal = "Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology",
    issn = "0034-6667",
    publisher = "Elsevier",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Vegetation and endemic tree response to orbital-scale climate changes in the Japanese archipelago during the last glacial–interglacial cycle based on pollen records from Lake Biwa, western Japan

    AU - Hayashi, Ryoma

    AU - Takahara, Hikaru

    AU - Inouchi, Yoshio

    AU - Takemura, Keiji

    AU - Igarashi, Yaeko

    PY - 2017/6/1

    Y1 - 2017/6/1

    N2 - This study examined the orbital-scale vegetation response to seasonal climate changes related to the East Asian monsoon and ocean currents during the last glacial–interglacial cycle based on a new continuous pollen record from Lake Biwa, western Japan. During MIS 6, 4, and 2, pinaceous conifer forests were present in both inland and Japan Sea coastal areas around Lake Biwa, influenced by cold and dry conditions in both summer and winter. In contrast, deciduous broadleaved forests and evergreen forests grew during interglacial periods in MIS 5e and 1 under relatively warm and humid conditions in summer, as well as in winter. Fagus crenata, a tree endemic to the Japanese archipelago, was especially widely distributed during MIS 5e due in part to winter snowfall caused by warm current inflows in the Sea of Japan. During MIS 5 and 3, temperate conifer trees were dominant. During periods of low summer insolation in MIS 5, the endemic tree Cryptomeria japonica became dominant in both inland and coastal areas of the region, likely as a result of high precipitation in early summer related to southward shifts of the summer monsoon front and moderate winter climate conditions. In contrast, Sciadopitys verticillata, which is also an endemic tree, had own habitat around inland areas of western Japan during the periods of high summer insolation in MIS 5. Climate fluctuations during the glacial–interglacial cycles created several ecological niches in time and space for each endemic tree in the Japanese archipelago.

    AB - This study examined the orbital-scale vegetation response to seasonal climate changes related to the East Asian monsoon and ocean currents during the last glacial–interglacial cycle based on a new continuous pollen record from Lake Biwa, western Japan. During MIS 6, 4, and 2, pinaceous conifer forests were present in both inland and Japan Sea coastal areas around Lake Biwa, influenced by cold and dry conditions in both summer and winter. In contrast, deciduous broadleaved forests and evergreen forests grew during interglacial periods in MIS 5e and 1 under relatively warm and humid conditions in summer, as well as in winter. Fagus crenata, a tree endemic to the Japanese archipelago, was especially widely distributed during MIS 5e due in part to winter snowfall caused by warm current inflows in the Sea of Japan. During MIS 5 and 3, temperate conifer trees were dominant. During periods of low summer insolation in MIS 5, the endemic tree Cryptomeria japonica became dominant in both inland and coastal areas of the region, likely as a result of high precipitation in early summer related to southward shifts of the summer monsoon front and moderate winter climate conditions. In contrast, Sciadopitys verticillata, which is also an endemic tree, had own habitat around inland areas of western Japan during the periods of high summer insolation in MIS 5. Climate fluctuations during the glacial–interglacial cycles created several ecological niches in time and space for each endemic tree in the Japanese archipelago.

    KW - Endemic tree species

    KW - Japanese archipelago

    KW - Lake Biwa

    KW - Orbital-scale climate changes

    KW - Pollen analysis

    KW - Vegetation fluctuations

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85014199829&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85014199829&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1016/j.revpalbo.2017.02.008

    DO - 10.1016/j.revpalbo.2017.02.008

    M3 - Article

    VL - 241

    SP - 85

    EP - 97

    JO - Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology

    JF - Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology

    SN - 0034-6667

    ER -