Very-Short-Duration, Low-Intensity Half-Time Re-warm up Increases Subsequent Intermittent Sprint Performance

Takuma Yanaoka, Yuka Hamada, Kyoko Kashiwabara, Kuran Kurata, Ryo Yamamoto, Masashi Miyashita, Norikazu Hirose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Yanaoka, T, Hamada, Y, Kashiwabara, K, Kurata, K, Yamamoto, R, Miyashita, M, and Hirose, N. Very-short-duration, low-intensity half-time re-warm up increases subsequent intermittent sprint performance. J Strength Cond Res 32(11): 3258-3266, 2018-This study investigated the effect of very-short-duration, low-intensity half-time re-warm up (RW) on subsequent intermittent sprint performance. Using a randomized cross-over design, 11 healthy men performed 3 trials. In the experimental trials, participants performed the first 40-minute intermittent exercise followed by a 15-minute half-time. The interventions at half-time were 15 minutes of seated rest (control), 3 minutes of moderate-intensity RW (cycling at 60% of maximal oxygen uptake [V[Combining Dot Above]O2max]; [60% RW]), and 3 minutes of low-intensity RW (cycling at 30% of V[Combining Dot Above]O2max; [30% RW]). After half-time, participants performed the Cycling Intermittent-Sprint Protocol (CISP), which consisted of 10 seconds of rest, 5 seconds of maximal sprint, and 105 seconds of active recovery at 50% of V[Combining Dot Above]O2max, with the cycles repeated over the 20-minute duration. The mean work and electromyogram amplitude during the sprint in the CISP were higher in both RW trials than in the control trial (p < 0.05). Muscle temperature, estimated from the skin temperature, at 60 minutes was higher in the 60% RW trial than in the control and 30% RW trials (p < 0.05). The mean change in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration during active recovery at 55-65 minutes tended to be higher in both RW trials than in the control trial (60% RW trial: p = 0.06, 30% RW trial: p = 0.06). In conclusion, very-short-duration, low-intensity RW increased intermittent sprint performance after the half-time, in comparison with a traditional passive half-time practice, and was as effective as a moderate-intensity RW when matched for total duration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3258-3266
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Volume32
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Nov 1

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Skin Temperature
Electromyography
Cross-Over Studies
Hemoglobins
Exercise
Oxygen
Muscles
Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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Very-Short-Duration, Low-Intensity Half-Time Re-warm up Increases Subsequent Intermittent Sprint Performance. / Yanaoka, Takuma; Hamada, Yuka; Kashiwabara, Kyoko; Kurata, Kuran; Yamamoto, Ryo; Miyashita, Masashi; Hirose, Norikazu.

In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Vol. 32, No. 11, 01.11.2018, p. 3258-3266.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yanaoka, Takuma ; Hamada, Yuka ; Kashiwabara, Kyoko ; Kurata, Kuran ; Yamamoto, Ryo ; Miyashita, Masashi ; Hirose, Norikazu. / Very-Short-Duration, Low-Intensity Half-Time Re-warm up Increases Subsequent Intermittent Sprint Performance. In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 2018 ; Vol. 32, No. 11. pp. 3258-3266.
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abstract = "Yanaoka, T, Hamada, Y, Kashiwabara, K, Kurata, K, Yamamoto, R, Miyashita, M, and Hirose, N. Very-short-duration, low-intensity half-time re-warm up increases subsequent intermittent sprint performance. J Strength Cond Res 32(11): 3258-3266, 2018-This study investigated the effect of very-short-duration, low-intensity half-time re-warm up (RW) on subsequent intermittent sprint performance. Using a randomized cross-over design, 11 healthy men performed 3 trials. In the experimental trials, participants performed the first 40-minute intermittent exercise followed by a 15-minute half-time. The interventions at half-time were 15 minutes of seated rest (control), 3 minutes of moderate-intensity RW (cycling at 60{\%} of maximal oxygen uptake [V[Combining Dot Above]O2max]; [60{\%} RW]), and 3 minutes of low-intensity RW (cycling at 30{\%} of V[Combining Dot Above]O2max; [30{\%} RW]). After half-time, participants performed the Cycling Intermittent-Sprint Protocol (CISP), which consisted of 10 seconds of rest, 5 seconds of maximal sprint, and 105 seconds of active recovery at 50{\%} of V[Combining Dot Above]O2max, with the cycles repeated over the 20-minute duration. The mean work and electromyogram amplitude during the sprint in the CISP were higher in both RW trials than in the control trial (p < 0.05). Muscle temperature, estimated from the skin temperature, at 60 minutes was higher in the 60{\%} RW trial than in the control and 30{\%} RW trials (p < 0.05). The mean change in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration during active recovery at 55-65 minutes tended to be higher in both RW trials than in the control trial (60{\%} RW trial: p = 0.06, 30{\%} RW trial: p = 0.06). In conclusion, very-short-duration, low-intensity RW increased intermittent sprint performance after the half-time, in comparison with a traditional passive half-time practice, and was as effective as a moderate-intensity RW when matched for total duration.",
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AU - Kurata, Kuran

AU - Yamamoto, Ryo

AU - Miyashita, Masashi

AU - Hirose, Norikazu

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