Viscoelastic characteristics of contracted collagen gels populated with rat fibroblasts or cardiomyocytes

Zhonggang Feng, Daiki Seya, Tatsuo Kitajima, Tadashi Kosawada, Takao Nakamura, Mitsuo Umezu

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The viscoelastic characteristics of contracted collagen gels populated with rat fibroblasts or cardiomyocytes were investigated by uniaxial tensile testing. Rat type I collagen-Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium solution (each 2 ml in volume, 0.5 mg/ml collagen concentration) containing 2.0 million rat fibroblasts or cardiomyocytes were cast in a circular shape. After gelation and culture for 10 days the contracted gels were first stretched to a tensile strain of approximately 0.20 at 4.6 × 10-3/s strain rate, and then the strain was kept unchanged for 3 min. The tensile stress in the gels was recorded. The results were regressed against the equations of the Kelvin viscoelastic model. It was found that the two elastic coefficients in the model were 6.5 ± 1.7 and 10.2 ± 3.2 kPa, respectively, for gels with cardiomyocytes and 5.1 ± 1.6 and 4.5 ± 0.9 kPa for those with fibroblasts; the values for gels with cardiomyocytes were significantly higher than those for gels with fibroblasts. The viscous coefficient was 169.6 ± 60.7 kPa s for the cardiomyocytes and 143.6 ± 44.7 kPa s for the fibroblasts. The relaxation time constant for gels with cardiomyocytes was 19.6 ± 10.6 s, significantly smaller than for gels with fibroblasts (36.4 ± 13.3 s). This study is the first to obtain viscoelastic data for living cell-contracted collagen gels. These data show that the viscous effect has a vital effect on the mechanical behavior of the gels and cannot be neglected in the culture and function of artificial substitutes based on contracted collagen gels. Furthermore, the data may imply that viscous coefficient of the gels might be closely related to collagen density rather than to cross linking among collagen fibrils.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)139-144
    Number of pages6
    JournalJournal of Artificial Organs
    Volume13
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010 Sep

    Fingerprint

    Fibroblasts
    Cardiac Myocytes
    Collagen
    Rats
    Gels
    Eagles
    Tensile strain
    Tensile testing
    Gelation
    Collagen Type I
    Tensile stress
    Relaxation time
    Strain rate
    Cells

    Keywords

    • Cardiomyocytes
    • Contracted collagen gel
    • Fibroblasts
    • Kelvin model
    • Mechanical characteristics
    • Viscoelasticity

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Biomaterials
    • Biomedical Engineering
    • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
    • Medicine (miscellaneous)

    Cite this

    Viscoelastic characteristics of contracted collagen gels populated with rat fibroblasts or cardiomyocytes. / Feng, Zhonggang; Seya, Daiki; Kitajima, Tatsuo; Kosawada, Tadashi; Nakamura, Takao; Umezu, Mitsuo.

    In: Journal of Artificial Organs, Vol. 13, No. 3, 09.2010, p. 139-144.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Feng, Zhonggang ; Seya, Daiki ; Kitajima, Tatsuo ; Kosawada, Tadashi ; Nakamura, Takao ; Umezu, Mitsuo. / Viscoelastic characteristics of contracted collagen gels populated with rat fibroblasts or cardiomyocytes. In: Journal of Artificial Organs. 2010 ; Vol. 13, No. 3. pp. 139-144.
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    abstract = "The viscoelastic characteristics of contracted collagen gels populated with rat fibroblasts or cardiomyocytes were investigated by uniaxial tensile testing. Rat type I collagen-Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium solution (each 2 ml in volume, 0.5 mg/ml collagen concentration) containing 2.0 million rat fibroblasts or cardiomyocytes were cast in a circular shape. After gelation and culture for 10 days the contracted gels were first stretched to a tensile strain of approximately 0.20 at 4.6 × 10-3/s strain rate, and then the strain was kept unchanged for 3 min. The tensile stress in the gels was recorded. The results were regressed against the equations of the Kelvin viscoelastic model. It was found that the two elastic coefficients in the model were 6.5 ± 1.7 and 10.2 ± 3.2 kPa, respectively, for gels with cardiomyocytes and 5.1 ± 1.6 and 4.5 ± 0.9 kPa for those with fibroblasts; the values for gels with cardiomyocytes were significantly higher than those for gels with fibroblasts. The viscous coefficient was 169.6 ± 60.7 kPa s for the cardiomyocytes and 143.6 ± 44.7 kPa s for the fibroblasts. The relaxation time constant for gels with cardiomyocytes was 19.6 ± 10.6 s, significantly smaller than for gels with fibroblasts (36.4 ± 13.3 s). This study is the first to obtain viscoelastic data for living cell-contracted collagen gels. These data show that the viscous effect has a vital effect on the mechanical behavior of the gels and cannot be neglected in the culture and function of artificial substitutes based on contracted collagen gels. Furthermore, the data may imply that viscous coefficient of the gels might be closely related to collagen density rather than to cross linking among collagen fibrils.",
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