Visual and tactile cross-modal mere exposure effects

Miho Kitamura, Jiro Gyoba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The affective system enables people to perceive and judge the emotional content of stimuli from various sensory modalities. Cross-modal interactions in affective processes, however, are less well understood. Using novel three-dimensional objects, we investigated cross-modal mere exposure effects between vision and touch. Previewing objects increased the preference judged by hand, while pre-touching did not modulate the preference judged by vision. Moreover, these effects were found to be independent of recognition performance, suggesting a dissociation between affective and cognitive processing. Our demonstration of a cross-modal mere exposure effect suggests that the affective system integrates inputs from visual and tactile modalities asymmetrically.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)147-154
Number of pages8
JournalCognition and Emotion
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Jan
Externally publishedYes

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Affective

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Visual and tactile cross-modal mere exposure effects. / Kitamura, Miho; Gyoba, Jiro.

In: Cognition and Emotion, Vol. 22, No. 1, 01.2008, p. 147-154.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kitamura, Miho ; Gyoba, Jiro. / Visual and tactile cross-modal mere exposure effects. In: Cognition and Emotion. 2008 ; Vol. 22, No. 1. pp. 147-154.
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