Visualization of mPer1 transcription in vitro

NMDA induces a rapid phase shift of mPer1 gene in cultured SCN

Makoto Asai, Shun Yamaguchi, Hiromi Isejima, Masafumi Jonouchi, Takahiro Moriya, Shigenobu Shibata, Masaki Kobayashi, Hitoshi Okamura

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    63 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Many physiological and behavioral phenomena are controlled by an internal, self-sustaining oscillator with a periodicity of approximately 24 hr. In mammals, the principal oscillator resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). A light pulse during the subjective night causes a phase shift of the circadian rhythm via direct glutamatergic retinal afferents to the SCN [1]. Along with the accepted theoretical models of the clock, it is suggested that behavioral resetting of mammals is completed within 2 hr [2]; however, the molecular mechanism has not been elucidated. Here, we show the real-time image of the transcription of the circadian-clock gene mPer1 in the cultured SCN by using the transgenic mice that carry a luciferase reporter gene under the control of the mPer1 promoter [3]. The real-time image demonstrates that the mPer1 promoter activity oscillates robustly in a circadian manner and that this promoter activity is reset rapidly (within 2-3 hr) when a phase shift occurs.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1524-1527
    Number of pages4
    JournalCurrent Biology
    Volume11
    Issue number19
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2001 Oct 2

    Fingerprint

    Suprachiasmatic Nucleus
    Mammals
    N-Methylaspartate
    Transcription
    Phase shift
    Clocks
    Visualization
    transcription (genetics)
    Genes
    promoter regions
    circadian rhythm
    Luciferases
    mammals
    Physiological Phenomena
    Circadian Clocks
    genes
    Periodicity
    luciferase
    Circadian Rhythm
    Reporter Genes

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

    Cite this

    Visualization of mPer1 transcription in vitro : NMDA induces a rapid phase shift of mPer1 gene in cultured SCN. / Asai, Makoto; Yamaguchi, Shun; Isejima, Hiromi; Jonouchi, Masafumi; Moriya, Takahiro; Shibata, Shigenobu; Kobayashi, Masaki; Okamura, Hitoshi.

    In: Current Biology, Vol. 11, No. 19, 02.10.2001, p. 1524-1527.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Asai, M, Yamaguchi, S, Isejima, H, Jonouchi, M, Moriya, T, Shibata, S, Kobayashi, M & Okamura, H 2001, 'Visualization of mPer1 transcription in vitro: NMDA induces a rapid phase shift of mPer1 gene in cultured SCN', Current Biology, vol. 11, no. 19, pp. 1524-1527. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0960-9822(01)00445-6
    Asai, Makoto ; Yamaguchi, Shun ; Isejima, Hiromi ; Jonouchi, Masafumi ; Moriya, Takahiro ; Shibata, Shigenobu ; Kobayashi, Masaki ; Okamura, Hitoshi. / Visualization of mPer1 transcription in vitro : NMDA induces a rapid phase shift of mPer1 gene in cultured SCN. In: Current Biology. 2001 ; Vol. 11, No. 19. pp. 1524-1527.
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