Volcanism in response to plate flexure

Naoto Hirano, Eiichi Takahashi, Junji Yamamoto, Watsue Abe, Stephanie P. Ingle, Ichiro Kaneoka, Takafumi Hirata, Jun Ichi Kimura, Teruaki Ishii, Yujiro Ogawa, Shiki Machida, Kiyoshi Suyehiro

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    155 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Volcanism on Earth is known to occur in three tectonic settings: divergent plate boundaries (such as mid-ocean ridges), convergent plate boundaries (such as island arcs), and hot spots. We report volcanism on the 135 million-year-old Pacific Plate not belonging to any of these categories. Small alkalic volcanoes form from small percent melts and originate in the asthenosphere, as implied by their trace element geochemistry and noble gas isotopic compositions. We propose that these small volcanoes erupt along lithospheric fractures in response to plate flexure during subduction. Minor extents of asthenospheric melting and the volcanoes' tectonic alignment and age progression in the direction opposite to that of plate motion provide evidence for the presence of a small percent melt in the asthenosphere.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1426-1428
    Number of pages3
    JournalScience
    Volume313
    Issue number5792
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2006 Sep 8

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    Noble Gases
    Trace Elements
    Islands
    Oceans and Seas
    Freezing
    Direction compound

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • General

    Cite this

    Hirano, N., Takahashi, E., Yamamoto, J., Abe, W., Ingle, S. P., Kaneoka, I., ... Suyehiro, K. (2006). Volcanism in response to plate flexure. Science, 313(5792), 1426-1428. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1128235

    Volcanism in response to plate flexure. / Hirano, Naoto; Takahashi, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Junji; Abe, Watsue; Ingle, Stephanie P.; Kaneoka, Ichiro; Hirata, Takafumi; Kimura, Jun Ichi; Ishii, Teruaki; Ogawa, Yujiro; Machida, Shiki; Suyehiro, Kiyoshi.

    In: Science, Vol. 313, No. 5792, 08.09.2006, p. 1426-1428.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Hirano, N, Takahashi, E, Yamamoto, J, Abe, W, Ingle, SP, Kaneoka, I, Hirata, T, Kimura, JI, Ishii, T, Ogawa, Y, Machida, S & Suyehiro, K 2006, 'Volcanism in response to plate flexure', Science, vol. 313, no. 5792, pp. 1426-1428. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1128235
    Hirano N, Takahashi E, Yamamoto J, Abe W, Ingle SP, Kaneoka I et al. Volcanism in response to plate flexure. Science. 2006 Sep 8;313(5792):1426-1428. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1128235
    Hirano, Naoto ; Takahashi, Eiichi ; Yamamoto, Junji ; Abe, Watsue ; Ingle, Stephanie P. ; Kaneoka, Ichiro ; Hirata, Takafumi ; Kimura, Jun Ichi ; Ishii, Teruaki ; Ogawa, Yujiro ; Machida, Shiki ; Suyehiro, Kiyoshi. / Volcanism in response to plate flexure. In: Science. 2006 ; Vol. 313, No. 5792. pp. 1426-1428.
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    abstract = "Volcanism on Earth is known to occur in three tectonic settings: divergent plate boundaries (such as mid-ocean ridges), convergent plate boundaries (such as island arcs), and hot spots. We report volcanism on the 135 million-year-old Pacific Plate not belonging to any of these categories. Small alkalic volcanoes form from small percent melts and originate in the asthenosphere, as implied by their trace element geochemistry and noble gas isotopic compositions. We propose that these small volcanoes erupt along lithospheric fractures in response to plate flexure during subduction. Minor extents of asthenospheric melting and the volcanoes' tectonic alignment and age progression in the direction opposite to that of plate motion provide evidence for the presence of a small percent melt in the asthenosphere.",
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