War Powers

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article offers a comparative survey of war-power arrangements in the United Kingdom, the United States, France, Germany, and Japan. The United Kingdom, United States, and France - long-standing liberal democracies and permanent members of the UN Security Council - have been quite active in deploying military forces abroad. In contrast, Germany, and Japan are latecomers both as liberal democracies and as participants in international military operations. The article focuses mainly on powers of initiating armed conflicts, including that of deploying armed forces into actual or potential conflicts, but deals neither with conducting war nor ending it, nor with related treaty-making power.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Oxford Handbook of Comparative Constitutional Law
PublisherOxford University Press
ISBN (Print)9780191751967, 9780199578610
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Nov 21
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Japan
Military
France
democracy
UN Security Council
conflict potential
treaty
military

Keywords

  • Armed conflicts
  • Deployment
  • France
  • Germany
  • International military operations
  • Japan
  • Liberal democracy
  • United Kingdom
  • United States
  • War-power arrangements

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Hasebe, Y. (2012). War Powers. In The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Constitutional Law Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199578610.013.0024

War Powers. / Hasebe, Yasuo.

The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Constitutional Law. Oxford University Press, 2012.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Hasebe, Y 2012, War Powers. in The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Constitutional Law. Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199578610.013.0024
Hasebe Y. War Powers. In The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Constitutional Law. Oxford University Press. 2012 https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199578610.013.0024
Hasebe, Yasuo. / War Powers. The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Constitutional Law. Oxford University Press, 2012.
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